Mobile Apps for Mental Health Issues: Meta-Review of Meta-Analyses.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_32CB68E343F2
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Mobile Apps for Mental Health Issues: Meta-Review of Meta-Analyses.
Journal
JMIR mHealth and uHealth
Author(s)
Lecomte T., Potvin S., Corbière M., Guay S., Samson C., Cloutier B., Francoeur A., Pennou A., Khazaal Y.
ISSN
2291-5222 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2291-5222
Publication state
Published
Issued date
29/05/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
8
Number
5
Pages
e17458
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Meta-Analysis
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Mental health apps have great potential to help people needing support to cope with distress or specific symptoms. In fact, there is an exponential increase in the number of mental health apps available on the internet, with less than 5% being actually studied.
This study aimed to assess the quality of the available evidence regarding the use of mental health apps and to summarize the results obtained so far.
Systematic reviews and meta-analyses were searched, specifically for mobile apps on mental health issues or symptoms, and rated using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system.
A total of 7 meta-analyses were carefully reviewed and rated. Although some meta-analyses looked at any mental health issue and analyzed the data together, these studies were of poorer quality and did not offer strong empirical support for the apps. Studies focusing specifically on anxiety symptoms or depressive symptoms were of moderate to high quality and generally had small to medium effect sizes. Similarly, the effects of apps on stress and quality of life tended to offer small to medium effects and were of moderate to high quality. Studies looking at stand-alone apps had smaller effect sizes but better empirical quality than studies looking at apps with guidance. The studies that included follow-ups mostly found a sustained impact of the app at an 11-week follow-up.
This meta-review revealed that apps for anxiety and depression hold great promise with clear clinical advantages, either as stand-alone self-management or as adjunctive treatments. More meta-analyses and more quality studies are needed to recommend apps for other mental health issues or for specific populations.
Keywords
Anxiety/therapy, Humans, Internet, Mental Health, Mobile Applications, Quality of Life, anxiety, apps, depression, mental health, meta, review
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
02/05/2020 13:45
Last modification date
02/11/2021 6:39
Usage data