The eusociality continuum

Details

Ressource 1Download: serval:BIB_32C883597048.P001 (679.54 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: author
License: Not specified
It was possible to publish this article open access thanks to a Swiss National Licence with the publisher.
Serval ID
serval:BIB_32C883597048
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
The eusociality continuum
Journal
Behavioral Ecology
Author(s)
Sherman P.W., Lacey E.A., Reeve H.K., Keller L.
ISSN
1045-2249
Publication state
Published
Issued date
1995
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
6
Number
1
Pages
102-108
Language
english
Abstract
Eusocial societies are traditionally characterized by a reproductive division of labor, an overlap of generations, and cooperative care of the breeders' young. Eusociality was once thought to occur only in termites, ants, and some bee and wasp species, but striking evolutionary convergences have recently become apparent between the societies of these insects and those of cooperatively breeding birds and mammals. These parallels have blurred distinctions between cooperative breeding and eusociality, leading to calls for either drastically restricting or expanding wage of these terms. We favor the latter approach. Cooperative breeding and eusociality are not discrete phenomena, but rather form a continuum of fundamentally similar social systems whose main differences lie in the distribution of lifetime reproductive success among group members. Therefore we propose to array vertebrate and invertebrate cooperative breeders along a common axis, representing a standardized measure of reproductive variance, and to drop such (loaded) terms as ''primitive'' and ''advanced'' eusociality. The terminology we propose unites all occurrences of alloparental helping of kin under a single theoretical umbrella (e.g., Hamilton's rule). Thus, cooperatively breeding vertebrates can be regarded as eusocial, just as eusocial inverbrates are cooperative breeders. We believe this integrated approach will foster potentially revealing cross-taxon comparisons, which are essential to understanding social evolution in birds, mammals, and in sects.
Keywords
avian eusociality cooperative breeding eusociality mammalian eusociality reproductive skews social system convergence
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
24/01/2008 19:40
Last modification date
25/09/2019 7:08
Usage data