A European perspective on intravascular catheter-related infections: report on the microbiology workload, aetiology and antimicrobial susceptibility (ESGNI-005 Study).

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_31550
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
A European perspective on intravascular catheter-related infections: report on the microbiology workload, aetiology and antimicrobial susceptibility (ESGNI-005 Study).
Journal
Clinical Microbiology and Infection
Author(s)
Bouza E., San Juan R., Muñoz P., Pascau J., Voss A., Desco M.
Working group(s)
Cooperative Group of the European Study Group on Nosocomial Infections (ESGNI)
ISSN
1198-743X (Print)
ISSN-L
1198-743X
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2004
Volume
10
Number
9
Pages
838-842
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
The laboratory workload, microbiological techniques and aetiology of catheter-related infections in European hospitals are mostly unknown. The present study (ESGNI-005) comprised a 1-day (22 October 2001), laboratory-based, point-prevalence survey based on a questionnaire completed by microbiology laboratories in European (European Union (EU) and non-EU) hospitals. Also included were questions requesting retrospective information for the year 2000. In total, 151 hospitals from 26 European countries participated, of which 78.1% were teaching institutions. Overall, the estimated population served by these institutions was 121,363,800, and the estimated number of admissions during 2000 was 6,712,050. The total number of catheter tips processed during 2000 was 142,727, or 21/1,000 admissions, of which 23.7% were considered to be positive in the institutions using semiquantitative or quantitative techniques. Overall, EU centres received significantly more catheter tip samples/1,000 admissions and had a significantly higher rate of 'positivity' (p < 0.0001) than non-EU centres. Of the institutions surveyed, 11.4% (7.2% in EU countries and 23.7% in non-EU countries; p 0.04) used only qualitative techniques for catheter tip sample processing. On the day of the study, 167 microorganisms were recovered from significant catheter tip cultures (122 patients), of which Gram-positive bacteria represented 70.7%, Gram-negative bacteria 22.2%, and yeasts 7.2%. The five most common microorganisms were coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida spp., Enterococcus spp. and Pseudomonas spp. Overall, 19% of catheter tip cultures were polymicrobial. In the case of S. aureus, 40% of isolates were resistant to oxacillin, as were 63.4% of coagulase-negative staphylococcus isolates. Of 37 Gram-negative isolates, 35% were resistant to cefotaxime, 31% to ceftazidime, and 27% to ciprofloxacin. Imipenem and cefepime had the lowest reported rates of resistance (11%).
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology, Bacteria/drug effects, Bacteria/isolation &amp, purification, Bacterial Infections/diagnosis, Bacterial Infections/microbiology, Catheterization, Central Venous/adverse effects, Catheters, Indwelling/microbiology, Cross Infection/diagnosis, Cross Infection/microbiology, Type="Geographic">Europe, Hospitals, Humans, Laboratories, Laboratory Techniques and Procedures, Microbial Sensitivity Tests, Microbiology, Workload
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
19/11/2007 12:30
Last modification date
20/08/2019 13:16
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