High expectation in non-evidence-based smoking cessation interventions among smokers--the CoLaus study.

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State: Public
Version: author
Serval ID
serval:BIB_3055F577AE21
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
High expectation in non-evidence-based smoking cessation interventions among smokers--the CoLaus study.
Journal
Preventive medicine
Author(s)
Marques-Vidal P., Melich-Cerveira J., Paccaud F., Waeber G., Vollenweider P., Cornuz J.
ISSN
1096-0260 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0091-7435
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2011
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
52
Number
3-4
Pages
258-261
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
To assess the preferred methods to quit smoking among current smokers.
Cross-sectional, population-based study conducted in Lausanne between 2003 and 2006 including 988 current smokers. Preference was assessed by questionnaire. Evidence-based (EB) methods were nicotine replacement, bupropion, physician or group consultations; non-EB-based methods were acupuncture, hypnosis and autogenic training.
EB methods were frequently (physician consultation: 48%, 95% confidence interval (45-51); nicotine replacement therapy: 35% (32-38)) or rarely (bupropion and group consultations: 13% (11-15)) preferred by the participants. Non-EB methods were preferred by a third (acupuncture: 33% (30-36)), a quarter (hypnosis: 26% (23-29)) or a seventh (autogenic training: 13% (11-15)) of responders. On multivariate analysis, women preferred both EB and non-EB methods more frequently than men (odds ratio and 95% confidence interval: 1.46 (1.10-1.93) and 2.26 (1.72-2.96) for any EB and non-EB method, respectively). Preference for non-EB methods was higher among highly educated participants, while no such relationship was found for EB methods.
Many smokers are unaware of the full variety of methods to quit smoking. Better information regarding these methods is necessary.

Keywords
Acupuncture Therapy, Adult, Aged, Antidepressive Agents, Second-Generation/therapeutic use, Bupropion/therapeutic use, Complementary Therapies, Cross-Sectional Studies, Evidence-Based Medicine, Female, Humans, Hypnosis, Male, Middle Aged, Nicotine/therapeutic use, Nicotinic Agonists/therapeutic use, Patient Preference/statistics & numerical data, Sex Factors, Smoking Cessation/methods, Switzerland
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
22/02/2011 16:28
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:15
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