Paternal investment affects prevalence of malaria.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_2D8C0F276A75
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Paternal investment affects prevalence of malaria.
Journal
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Author(s)
Richner H., Christe P., Oppliger Anne
ISSN
0027-8424[print], 0027-8424[linking]
Publication state
Published
Issued date
1995
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
92
Number
4
Pages
1192-1194
Language
english
Abstract
Both reproduction and parasite defense can be costly, and an animal may face a trade-off between investing in offspring or in parasite defense. In contrast to the findings from nonexperimental studies that the poorly reproducing individuals are often the ones with high parasite loads, this life-history view predicts that individuals with high reproductive investment will show high parasite prevalence. Here we provide an experimental confirmation of a positive association between parental investment levels of male great tits Parus major and the prevalence of Plasmodium spp, a hematozoa causing malaria in various bird species. We manipulated brood size, measured feeding effort of both males and females, and assessed the prevalence of the hemoparasite from blood smears. In enlarged broods the males, but not the females, showed significantly higher rates of food provisioning to the chicks, and the rate of malarial infection was found to be more than double in male, but not female, parents of enlarged broods. The findings show that there may be a trade-off between reproductive effort and parasite defense of the host and also suggest a mechanism for the well documented trade-off between current reproductive effort and parental survival.
Keywords
Animals, Behavior, Animal, Birds/parasitology, Birds/physiology, Female, Malaria, Avian/epidemiology, Malaria, Avian/parasitology, Male, Plasmodium/isolation & purification, Prevalence, Reproduction
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
24/01/2008 19:14
Last modification date
20/08/2019 13:12
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