Association of hypertensive status and its drug treatment with lipid and haemostatic factors in middle-aged men: the PRIME study

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_2C9CD82E7D40
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Association of hypertensive status and its drug treatment with lipid and haemostatic factors in middle-aged men: the PRIME study
Journal
Journal of Human Hypertension
Author(s)
Marques-Vidal P., Montaye M., Haas B., Bingham A., Evans A., Juhan-Vague I., Ferrières J., Luc G., Amouyel P., Arveiler D., McMaster D., Ruidavets J.B., Bard J.M., Scarabin P.Y., Ducimetière P.
ISSN
0950-9240 (Print)
ISSN-L
0950-9240
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2000
Volume
14
Number
8
Pages
511-518
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
AIMS: To assess the association of hypertensive status and antihypertensive drug treatment with lipid and haemostatic levels in middle-aged men.
METHODS AND RESULTS: Hypertensive status, antihypertensive drug treatment, total and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglyceride, apoproteins A-I and B, lipoparticles LpA-I, LpE:B and Lp(a), fibrinogen, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) activity and factor VII were assessed in a sample of men 50-59 years living in France (n = 7050) and Northern Ireland (n = 2374). After adjustment for age, body mass index, smoking status, educational level, country, alcohol drinking and hypolipidaemic drug treatment, untreated hypertensive subjects had higher levels of total cholesterol, triglyceride, apoproteins A-I and B and PAI-I activity than normotensive subjects. On univariate analysis, diuretics decreased total and HDL-cholesterol and apoproteins A-I and B; those differences remained after multivariate adjustment. Treatment with beta-blockers decreased total and HDL-cholesterol, apoprotein A-I and LpA-I, and this effect remained after multivariate adjustment. Calcium channel blockers decreased total cholesterol and apoproteins A-I and B; those differences remained significant after multivariate adjustment. ACE inhibitors decreased total cholesterol, triglycerides, apoprotein B and LpE:B; and this effect remained after multivariate adjustment. Analysis of the subjects on monotherapy showed beta-blockers to decrease total cholesterol and HDL parameters and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors to decrease low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-related parameters, while no effect was found for the other antihypertensive drugs.
CONCLUSIONS: Hypertensive status is associated with an unfavourable lipid and haemostatic profile in middle-aged men. Antihypertensive treatment with beta-blockers decreases HDL parameters, whereas treatment with ACE inhibitors appears to decrease total cholesterol and LDL-related parameters.
Keywords
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use, Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use, Calcium Channel Blockers/therapeutic use, Cholesterol/blood, Cholesterol, HDL/blood, Diuretics/therapeutic use, Hypertension/blood, Hypertension/drug therapy, Lipids/blood, Lipoproteins, LDL/blood
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
01/12/2016 15:01
Last modification date
20/08/2019 13:11
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