Exercise-related sensations contribute to decrease power during repeated cycle sprints with limited influence on neural drive.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_2BC19B834F1A
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Exercise-related sensations contribute to decrease power during repeated cycle sprints with limited influence on neural drive.
Journal
European journal of applied physiology
Author(s)
Girard O., Billaut F., Christian R.J., Bradley P.S., Bishop D.J.
ISSN
1439-6327 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1439-6319
Publication state
Published
Issued date
11/2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
117
Number
11
Pages
2171-2179
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Randomized Controlled Trial
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
We manipulated the inspired oxygen fraction (FiO <sub>2</sub> ) to examine the effects of physiological perturbations on exercise-related sensations and the neural drive of the quadriceps during repeated, brief, maximal cycle sprints.
Nine active males completed a repeated sprint cycle protocol (10 × 4-s maximal sprints with 30 s of passive recovery) in normoxia (NM; FiO <sub>2</sub> 0.21) and severe normobaric hypoxia (HY; FiO <sub>2</sub> 0.13). Peak power, quadriceps Root Mean Squared electromyography (RMS EMG), physiological (heart rate, arterial oxygen saturation, blood lactate concentration) and perceptual responses were recorded.
The 10 sprints in HY were associated with lower arterial oxygen saturation values compared to NM [80.7 ± 0.9 vs. 95.6 ± 0.6%; P < 0.001; effect size (ES) = 0.98], higher blood lactate values (11.9 ± 0.4 vs. 9.9 ± 0.9 mmol L <sup>-1</sup> ; P = 0.05; ES = 0.36), and greater exercise-related sensations (~36%; P < 0.001; ES > 0.47). Mean power for sprints 1-10 were lower (-13 ± 3%; P = 0.001; ES = 0.79), and sprint decrement was more pronounced in HY compared to NM (21.4 ± 3.7 vs. 13.2 ± 2.7%; P = 0.003). There was a 17% decrease in RMS EMG activity from the first to the last sprint (P < 0.001; ES = 0.65), independent of condition (P = 0.597; ES = 0.04).
Despite severe hypoxia exacerbating both physiological and perceptual perturbations, the performance decrement observed during the repeated sprint protocol did not coincide with an accentuated decline in RMS EMG activity. These data suggest that higher-than-normal exercise-related sensations or perceptions coincide with fatigue during repeated sprinting, independent of changes in neural drive, when the task characteristics are known beforehand.
Keywords
Adult, Exercise, Humans, Hypoxia/physiopathology, Male, Muscle Contraction, Muscle, Skeletal/innervation, Muscle, Skeletal/physiology, Oxygen/metabolism, Sensation, Central fatigue, Hypoxia, Overall perceived exertion, Perceptual cues, Repeated-sprint ability
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
06/09/2017 15:33
Last modification date
20/08/2019 13:11
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