Effects of dinner composition on postprandial macronutrient oxidation in prepubertal girls.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_2B9F73256DE7
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Effects of dinner composition on postprandial macronutrient oxidation in prepubertal girls.
Journal
Obesity Research
Author(s)
Maffeis C., Schutz Y., Chini L., Grezzani A., Piccoli R., Tatò L.
ISSN
1071-7323 (Print)
ISSN-L
1071-7323
Publication state
Published
Issued date
07/2004
Volume
12
Number
7
Pages
1128-1135
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To see whether a fat-rich (50%) evening meal promoted fat oxidation and a different spontaneous food intake on the following day at breakfast than a meal with a lower fat content (20%) in 10 prepubertal obese girls.
RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: The postabsorptive and postprandial (10.5 hours) energy expenditure after a low-fat (LF) (20% fat, 68% carbohydrate, 12% protein) and an isocaloric (2.1 MJ) and isoproteic high-fat (HF; 50% fat, 38% carbohydrate, 12% protein) meal were measured by indirect calorimetry.
RESULTS: Fat oxidation was not significantly different after the two meals [LF, 31 +/- 9 vs. HF, 35 +/- 9 g/10.5 hours, p = not significant (NS)]. The girls oxidized 1.8 +/- 0.9 times more fat than that ingested (11.1 grams) with the LF meal vs. 0.3 +/- 0.3 times more fat than that ingested (27.1 grams) with the HF meal (p < 0.001). Carbohydrate oxidation was significantly higher after an LF than an HF meal (39 +/- 12 vs. 29 +/- 9 g/10.5 hours, p < 0,05). At breakfast, the girls spontaneously ingested a similar amount of energy (1.5 +/- 0.7 vs. 1.5 +/- 0.6 MJ, p = NS) and macronutrient proportions (fat, 23% vs. 26%, p = NS; protein, 9% vs. 10%; carbohydrate, 68% vs. 64%,) independently of their having eaten an HF or an LF dinner.
DISCUSSION: An HF dinner did not stimulate fat oxidation, and no compensatory effect in spontaneous food intake was observed during breakfast the following morning. Cumulated total fat oxidation after dinner was higher than total fat ingested at dinner, but a much larger negative fat balance was observed after the LF meal. Spontaneous energy and nutrient intakes at breakfast were similar after LF and HF isocaloric, isoproteic dinners. This study points out the lack of sensitivity of short-term fat balance to subsequently readjust fat intake and emphasizes the importance of an LF meal to avoid transient positive fat imbalance.
Keywords
Child, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diet, Dietary Carbohydrates/administration & dosage, Dietary Carbohydrates/metabolism, Dietary Fats/administration & dosage, Dietary Fats/metabolism, Dietary Proteins/administration & dosage, Energy Intake, Energy Metabolism, Female, Food, Humans, Oxidation-Reduction, Oxygen Consumption, Rest
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
21/01/2008 13:08
Last modification date
20/08/2019 13:11
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