Low subjective social status in the police is linked to health-relevant changes in diurnal salivary alpha-amylase activity in Swiss police officers.

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State: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
Serval ID
serval:BIB_2B5425EAFC27
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Low subjective social status in the police is linked to health-relevant changes in diurnal salivary alpha-amylase activity in Swiss police officers.
Journal
Stress
Author(s)
Habersaat S., Abdellaoui S., Geiger A.M., Urben S., Wolf J.M.
ISSN
1607-8888 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1025-3890
Publication state
Published
Issued date
01/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
21
Number
1
Pages
11-18
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
The objective of this study was to assess basal autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity as a pathway linking subjective social status to health in a high-demand work environment. It was hypothesized that officers with a lower status experienced more chronic stress (higher basal ANS activity) and that chronic stress was related to more health problems. Fifty-six male and female Swiss police officers self-reported on subjective social status (country, community, friends, police) and their health (depression, post-traumatic stress, physical symptoms) and collected 12 saliva samples over two days for basal α-amylase activation (sAA) assessment. Multilevel regression analyses revealed that subjective social status in the police and physical symptoms explained a significant part of the variance in diurnal sAA activity patterns. The current findings support the idea that more narrowly defined subjective social status may be more closely linked to biological stress mechanisms. Additionally, sAA activity was specifically related to physical, but not mental health problems. These results suggest that subjective social status referencing one's work environment may be a promising early indicator of health-relevant changes in stress-related physiological systems.
Keywords
Adult, Autonomic Nervous System/metabolism, Depression/metabolism, Depression/psychology, Female, Health Status, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Multilevel Analysis, Police/psychology, Regression Analysis, Saliva/chemistry, Salivary alpha-Amylases/metabolism, Social Class, Social Environment, Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/metabolism, Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology, Stress, Physiological/physiology, Stress, Psychological/metabolism, Stress, Psychological/psychology, Workplace/psychology, Salivary alpha-amylase, mental health, physical health, police, stress, subjective social status
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
30/10/2017 11:05
Last modification date
20/08/2019 13:10
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