Integrating landscape ecology into landscape practice in Central African Rainforests

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Ressource 1Download: Walters2021CarpeLandscapesLandscapeEcology.pdf (550.70 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: Final published version
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_2A8C24DDB29B
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Integrating landscape ecology into landscape practice in Central African Rainforests
Journal
Landscape Ecology
Author(s)
Walters G., Sayer J., Boedhihartono A. K., Endamana D., Angu Angu K.
ISSN
0921-2973
1572-9761
Publication state
Published
Issued date
03/04/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Language
english
Abstract
Context: We describe how large landscape-scale conservation initiatives involving local communities, NGOs and resource managers have engaged with landscape scientists with the goal of achieving landscape sustainability. We focus on two landscapes where local people, practitioners and landscape ecol-ogists have co-produced knowledge to design conservation interventions. Objective: We seek to understand how landscape ecology can engage with practical landscape management to contribute to managing landscapes sustainably. Methods: We focus on two large tropical landscapes: the Sangha Tri-National landscape (Cameroon, Republic of Congo and the Central African Republic) and the Batéké-Léfini Landscape (Gabon and Republic of Congo). We evaluate (1) a participatory method used in the Sangha Tri-National landscape that embeds interdisciplinary researchers and practitioners within a landscape to apply transdisciplinary learning to landscape conservation and (2) a participatory landscape zoning method where interdisciplinary teams of conservation practitioners analyse local land and resource use in the Batéké-Léfini landscape. Results: We find that landscape ecology's tradition of understanding the historical context of resource use can inform landscape conservation practice and natural resource mapping. We also find that the Sangha Group provides an example for landscape ecology on how to integrate local people and their knowledge to better understand and influence landscape processes. Conclusions: Place-based engagement as well as the uptake of co-produced knowledge by policy makers are key in enabling sustainable landscapes. Success occurs when researchers, local communities and resource managers engage directly with landscape processes.
Keywords
Landscape approach, Central Africa, Landscape conservation, Congo Basin, Forest peoples, Landscape sustainability, Sangha Tri National, Batéké Plateaux
Open Access
Yes
Funding(s)
University of Lausanne
Create date
03/04/2021 18:45
Last modification date
10/04/2021 6:33
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