Computational modeling of resting-state activity demonstrates markers of normalcy in children with prenatal or perinatal stroke.

Details

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
Serval ID
serval:BIB_29E87B018172
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Computational modeling of resting-state activity demonstrates markers of normalcy in children with prenatal or perinatal stroke.
Journal
Journal of Neuroscience : the Official Journal of the Society For Neuroscience
Author(s)
Adhikari M.H., Raja Beharelle A., Griffa A., Hagmann P., Solodkin A., McIntosh A.R., Small S.L., Deco G.
ISSN
1529-2401 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0270-6474
Publication state
Published
Issued date
06/2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
35
Number
23
Pages
8914-8924
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Children who sustain a prenatal or perinatal brain injury in the form of a stroke develop remarkably normal cognitive functions in certain areas, with a particular strength in language skills. A dominant explanation for this is that brain regions from the contralesional hemisphere "take over" their functions, whereas the damaged areas and other ipsilesional regions play much less of a role. However, it is difficult to tease apart whether changes in neural activity after early brain injury are due to damage caused by the lesion or by processes related to postinjury reorganization. We sought to differentiate between these two causes by investigating the functional connectivity (FC) of brain areas during the resting state in human children with early brain injury using a computational model. We simulated a large-scale network consisting of realistic models of local brain areas coupled through anatomical connectivity information of healthy and injured participants. We then compared the resulting simulated FC values of healthy and injured participants with the empirical ones. We found that the empirical connectivity values, especially of the damaged areas, correlated better with simulated values of a healthy brain than those of an injured brain. This result indicates that the structural damage caused by an early brain injury is unlikely to have an adverse and sustained impact on the functional connections, albeit during the resting state, of damaged areas. Therefore, these areas could continue to play a role in the development of near-normal function in certain domains such as language in these children.
Keywords
Brain/blood supply, Brain Injuries/etiology, Brain Injuries/pathology, Brain Mapping, Case-Control Studies, Child, Computer Simulation, Female, Functional Laterality/physiology, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Language Disorders/etiology, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Models, Neurological, Neural Pathways/pathology, Nonlinear Dynamics, Oxygen/blood, Stroke/complications
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
22/07/2015 13:43
Last modification date
20/08/2019 13:09
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