Diabetes mellitus and the late complications: influence of the genetic factors

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_29B37BAD90DF
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Diabetes mellitus and the late complications: influence of the genetic factors
Journal
Diabetes and Metabolism
Author(s)
Ruiz  J.
ISSN
1262-3636
Publication state
Published
Issued date
03/1997
Volume
23 Suppl 2
Pages
57-63
Notes
97259686
1262-3636
Journal Article
Review
Review, Tutorial --- Old month value: Mar --- Old uritopublisher value: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=9105785
Abstract
Epidemiological, population and familial studies have revealed the multifactorial aspect of diabetes mellitus. Several mutations implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes have been described over the last decade. These mutations are localised within genes associated with glucose metabolism, providing a molecular basis for the heterogeneity in the clinical presentation of diabetes mellitus. However, chronic hyperglycaemia associated with other vascular risk factors can only partly explain the incidence of micro and macrovascular complications. Familial studies have revealed the presence of a familial susceptibility for some vascular complications as nephropathy and coronary heart disease. In addition, these two vascular complications of diabetes mellitus are frequently associated in the same individual. This familial susceptibility could not be exclusively explained by environmental factors. Consequently the quest for susceptibility genes of vascular complications appears as a logical approach. The study of genes associated with an increased cardiovascular risk like the renin angiotensin system, the hemostasis cascade or the lipoproteins, may constitute the first step in this new research avenue. Moreover, glycation and oxidation pathways seem to play a role in the development of vascular complications. For example, the paraoxonase genes are good candidates for an increased vascular risk. This enzyme is entirely bound to HDL-cholesterol and could explain its anti-oxidant capacity. The natural substrate of this enzyme is unknown but there is some evidence suggesting that it may participate in the oxidated phospholipids degradation. Functional studies of paraoxonase with other exogenous substrates have revealed different phenotypes associated with different catalytic activities. In addition, varying enzymatic activities seem to be associated with different polymorphisms of the paraoxonase gene recently described (at position 192 and 55 of the paraoxonase gene), and these two polymorphisms have been recently studied in relation with coronary heart disease in non insulin dependent diabetic patients. The two polymorphisms were associated with coronary heart disease. But these initial results still await confirmation in different populations. Such studies will likely open the way to novel approach of vascular complications in diabetes mellitus.
Keywords
Age of Onset Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology/*genetics Diabetic Angiopathies/*genetics Environmental Health Esterases/genetics Ethnic Groups/*genetics Human Renin-Angiotensin System/genetics Risk Factors
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
03/03/2008 15:15
Last modification date
20/08/2019 13:09
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