Digital haptics improve speed of visual search performance in a dual-task setting.

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_285B8506D6E3
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Digital haptics improve speed of visual search performance in a dual-task setting.
Journal
Scientific reports
Author(s)
Tivadar R.I., Arnold R.C., Turoman N., Knebel J.F., Murray M.M.
ISSN
2045-2322 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2045-2322
Publication state
Published
Issued date
16/06/2022
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
12
Number
1
Pages
9728
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Dashboard-mounted touchscreen tablets are now common in vehicles. Screen/phone use in cars likely shifts drivers' attention away from the road and contributes to risk of accidents. Nevertheless, vision is subject to multisensory influences from other senses. Haptics may help maintain or even increase visual attention to the road, while still allowing for reliable dashboard control. Here, we provide a proof-of-concept for the effectiveness of digital haptic technologies (hereafter digital haptics), which use ultrasonic vibrations on a tablet screen to render haptic perceptions. Healthy human participants (N = 25) completed a divided-attention paradigm. The primary task was a centrally-presented visual conjunction search task, and the secondary task entailed control of laterally-presented sliders on the tablet. Sliders were presented visually, haptically, or visuo-haptically and were vertical, horizontal or circular. We reasoned that the primary task would be performed best when the secondary task was haptic-only. Reaction times (RTs) on the visual search task were fastest when the tablet task was haptic-only. This was not due to a speed-accuracy trade-off; there was no evidence for modulation of VST accuracy according to modality of the tablet task. These results provide the first quantitative support for introducing digital haptics into vehicle and similar contexts.
Keywords
Haptic Technology, Humans, Vision, Ocular, Visual Perception
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Funding(s)
Swiss National Science Foundation / Projects / 169206
Create date
05/07/2022 10:30
Last modification date
20/07/2022 6:08
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