Serum and CSF levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) in cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass: a marker of brain injury?

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_2824425D4A3B
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Serum and CSF levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) in cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass: a marker of brain injury?
Journal
Brain & development
Author(s)
Schmitt B., Bauersfeld U., Schmid E.R., Tuchschmid P., Molinari L., Fanconi S., Bandtlow C.
ISSN
0387-7604
Publication state
Published
Issued date
1998
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
20
Number
7
Pages
536-9
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article - Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
We investigated whether neuron-specific enolase (NSE) in serum or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) reflects subtle or manifest brain injury in children undergoing cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). NSE was measured in serum (s-NSE) before, and up to, 102 h after surgery in 27 children undergoing cardiac surgery with CPB. In 11 children, CSF-NSE was also measured 48 or 66 h post-surgery. As erythrocytes contain NSE, hemoglobin concentration in the samples was determined spectrophotometrically at 550 nm (cut-off limit: absorbance 0.4 = 560 mg/l) in 14 children and in a further 13 children by spectroscopic multicomponent analysis (cut-off limit 5 micromol/l = 80 mg/l). One hundred and one of 214 post-operative serum samples (47%) had to be discarded because of hemolysis (18% spectrophotometrically at 550 nm and 88% with spectroscopic multicomponent analysis). On the first and second post-operative day, the median s-NSE values were significantly higher when compared with samples taken after 54 h or longer (P = 0.008 and P = 0.002). All CSF-NSE levels were within the normal range and below the s-NSE measured in the same patient. Although in our study elevated s-NSE seems to indicate brain injury in CPB-surgery, the low concentration of NSE in the post-operative CSF of 11 children puts the neuronal origin of s-NSE in question. NSE from other non-neuronal tissues probably contributes to the elevated s-NSE. Additionally, normal post-operative CSF-NSE values in two children with post-operative neurological sequelae might question the predictive value of CSF-NSE with regard to brain injury.
Keywords
Biological Markers, Brain, Brain Diseases, Child, Preschool, Coronary Artery Bypass, Female, Heart Diseases, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Male, Myocardium, Phosphopyruvate Hydratase, Postoperative Complications
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
25/01/2008 10:06
Last modification date
20/08/2019 13:07
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