Early-life socioeconomic circumstances explain health differences in old age, but not their evolution over time

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_26F95359C59A
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Early-life socioeconomic circumstances explain health differences in old age, but not their evolution over time
Journal
Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health
Author(s)
Cheval Boris, Orsholits Dan, Sieber Stefan, Stringhini Silvia, Courvoisier Delphine, Kliegel Matthias, Boisgontier Matthieu P, Cullati Stephane
ISSN
1470-2738 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0143-005X
Publication state
Published
Issued date
08/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
73
Number
8
Pages
703-711
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Early-life socioeconomic circumstances (SEC) are associated with health in old age. However, epidemiological evidences on the influence of these early-life risk factors on trajectories of healthy ageing are inconsistent, preventing drawing solid conclusion about their potential influence. Here, to fill this knowledge gap, we used a statistical approach adapted to estimating change over time and an outcome-wide epidemiology approach to investigate whether early-life SEC were associated with the level of and rate of decline of physical, cognitive and emotional functioning over time.
We used data on more than 23 000 adults in older age from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe, a 12-year large-scale longitudinal study with repeated measurements of multiple health indicators of the same participants over time (2004 -2015, assessments every 2 years). Confounder-adjusted linear growth curve models were used to examine the associations of early-life SEC with the evolution of muscle strength, lung function, cognitive function, depressive symptoms and well-being over time.
We consistently found an association between early-life SEC and the mean levels of all health indicators at age 63.5, with a critical role played by the cultural aspect of disadvantage. These associations were only partly explained by adult-life SEC factors. By contrast, evidences supporting an association between early-life SEC and the rate of change in health indicators were weak and inconsistent.
Early-life SEC are associated with health in old age, but not with trajectories of healthy ageing. Conceptual models in life course research should consider the possibility of a limited influence of early-life SEC on healthy ageing trajectories.
Keywords
ageing trajectories, early life, health status, healthy ageing, socioeconomic factors
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Funding(s)
Swiss National Science Foundation / PZ00P1_180040
Swiss National Science Foundation / 51NF40-160590
Create date
15/04/2019 16:51
Last modification date
20/09/2019 5:09
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