Sarcopenia or muscle modifications in neurologic diseases: a lexical or patophysiological difference?

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
License: Not specified
Serval ID
serval:BIB_268BFC42973F
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Sarcopenia or muscle modifications in neurologic diseases: a lexical or patophysiological difference?
Journal
European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Author(s)
Carda S., Cisari C., Invernizzi M.
ISSN
1973-9095 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1973-9087
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2013
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
49
Number
1
Pages
119-130
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Sarcopenia is a condition characterized by a decrease in muscle mass and function (strength and mobility) that is frequently observed in the elderly. In people with paresis and altered mobility due to central nervous system (CNS) diseases, this definition then may not be applicable. In CNS diseases, mainly stroke and spinal cord injury, different and specific patterns of muscle loss and muscle changes have been described, due to denervation, disuse atrophy, spasticity and myosteatosis. The main observations available about these phenomena in CNS diseases are reviewed, and a broad view on the specific physiopathological mechanisms is also described. Moreover, a description of the potential pharmacological targets and treatment strategies (physical and nutritional) is provided. Since sarcopenia of the elderly and muscle modifications and muscle atrophy in CNS diseases have different mechanisms, it is probable that they do not respond equally to the same treatments.
Keywords
Sarcopenia, Muscular diseases, atrophic, Central nervous system diseases, stroke, spinal cord injuries
Pubmed
Create date
12/04/2013 12:40
Last modification date
15/07/2020 5:26
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