Sodium and calcium transport pathways along the mammalian distal nephron: from rabbit to human.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_26655
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Sodium and calcium transport pathways along the mammalian distal nephron: from rabbit to human.
Journal
American Journal of Physiology. Renal Physiology
Author(s)
Loffing J., Kaissling B.
ISSN
0363-6127
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2003
Volume
284
Number
4
Pages
F628-F643
Language
english
Abstract
The final adjustment of renal sodium and calcium excretion is achieved by the distal nephron, in which transepithelial ion transport is under control of various hormones, tubular fluid composition, and flow rate. Acquired or inherited diseases leading to deranged renal sodium and calcium balance have been linked to dysfunction of the distal nephron. Diuretic drugs elicit their effects on sodium balance by specifically inhibiting sodium transport proteins in the apical plasma membrane of distal nephron segments. The identification of the major apical sodium transport proteins allows study of their precise distribution pattern along the distal nephron and helps address their cellular and molecular regulation under various physiological and pathophysiological settings. This review focuses on the topological arrangement of sodium and calcium transport proteins along the cortical distal nephron and on some aspects of their functional regulation. The availability of data on the distribution of transporters in various species points to the strengths, as well as to the limitations, of animal models for the extrapolation to humans.
Keywords
Animals, Calcium, Calcium Channels, Humans, Ion Transport, Mice, Nephrons, Rabbits, Rats, Sodium, Sodium Channels
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
19/11/2007 12:23
Last modification date
20/08/2019 13:05
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