The response to the social environment reveals sex-dependent behavioural syndromes in the Bosca's newt (Lissotriton boscai)

Details

Ressource 1Download: BIB_2637B0CD2711.P001.pdf (222.36 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: Final published version
Serval ID
serval:BIB_2637B0CD2711
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
The response to the social environment reveals sex-dependent behavioural syndromes in the Bosca's newt (Lissotriton boscai)
Journal
Journal of Ethology
Author(s)
Aragón  P.
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2011
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
29
Pages
79-83
Abstract
There is growing evidence of correlated behaviours across time, situations and/or contexts (behavioural syndromes) in animals, and their link with fitness makes these studies mandatory to understanding the species' behavioural and evolutionary ecology. Whereas the role of the social environment on behavioural syndromes is receiving increasing attention, experimental studies testing whether environmental fluctuations govern sex-dependent behavioural syndromes are scarce. I performed an experiment to test for the existence of sex differences in activity syndromes through a changing social environment. Males and females of Bosca's newt (Lissotriton boscai) were faced with three social situations perceived through chemical cues (own odour, no odour and same-sex conspecific odours) to measure their activity levels. Comparisons of the activity levels showed that both males and females discriminated the odourless stimuli from newt odour (either their own or the conspecific stimuli). Whereas activity levels were positively correlated between their own and the odourless stimuli in both sexes, the association between the odourless and conspecific stimuli was positive in males but decoupled in females. This is the first experimental evidence of sex differences in activity syndromes of wild-caught animals in response to social changes.
Keywords
Behavioural syndromes, Chemical signals, Lissotriton boscai, Personalities, Sex differences, Social sensitivity
Create date
14/01/2011 14:19
Last modification date
20/08/2019 13:04
Usage data