Influence of collection and storage materials on glycol ether concentrations in urine and blood.

Details

Ressource 1Request a copy Under embargo until 20/10/2022.
UNIL restricted access
State: Public
Version: author
License: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_262181991339
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Influence of collection and storage materials on glycol ether concentrations in urine and blood.
Journal
The Science of the total environment
Author(s)
Borgatta M., Hechon J., Wild P., Hopf N.B.
ISSN
1879-1026 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0048-9697
Publication state
Published
Issued date
20/10/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
792
Pages
148196
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Glycol ethers, such as propylene glycol monomethyl ether (PGME) and propylene glycol monobuthyl ether (PGBE) are solvents found in many professional and domestic products. In biomonitoring studies, the type of materials used to collect, store, and transport these samples can greatly influence the analytical results because materials can adsorb the analyte. Plastic tubes generally have a hydrophobic internal surface that can reduce the concentration of certain chemicals and result in an underestimation of workers' exposures. The aim of this study was to assess whether the storage of PGME and PGBE spiked blood and urine samples led to different PGME and PGBE concentrations in vials made of glass and common plastics (polypropylene (PP), polyethylene (PE) or polystyrene (PS)). Glycol ether concentrations were quantified with headspace gas chromatography equipped with a flame ionization detector. Our results show stable urinary PGME and PGBE concentrations in PP, while up to 15% variations in urinary PGME for PE and PS. For PGME and PGBE in blood, we observed no statistically significant losses in glass, while losses were recorded for all types of plastic tested (PS, PP and PE). We conclude that biomonitoring samples should be collected in glass for blood and PP for urine.
Keywords
Chromatography, Gas, Ether, Ethers, Flame Ionization, Humans, Solvents, Analytical analysis, Biomonitoring, Blood sample, Measured concentration, Occupational exposure, Urinary level
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
29/06/2021 9:45
Last modification date
12/01/2022 8:08
Usage data