High occurrence of hepatitis E virus in samples from wastewater treatment plants in Switzerland and comparison with other enteric viruses.

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State: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
Serval ID
serval:BIB_2599134504C4
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
High occurrence of hepatitis E virus in samples from wastewater treatment plants in Switzerland and comparison with other enteric viruses.
Journal
Water Research
Author(s)
Masclaux Frédéric G., Hotz Philipp, Friedli Drita, Savova-Bianchi Dessisslava, Oppliger Anne
ISSN
1879-2448 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0043-1354
Publication state
Published
Issued date
15/09/2013
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
47
Number
14
Pages
5101-5109
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is responsible for many enterically transmitted viral hepatitides around the world. It is currently one of the waterborne diseases of global concern. In industrialized countries, HEV appears to be more common than previously thought, even if it is rarely virulent. In Switzerland, seroprevalence studies revealed that HEV is endemic, but no information was available on its environmental spread. The aim of this study was to investigate -using qPCR- the occurrence and concentration of HEV and three other viruses (norovirus genogroup II, human adenovirus-40 and porcine adenovirus) in influents and effluents of 31 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Switzerland. Low concentrations of HEV were detected in 40 out of 124 WWTP influent samples, showing that HEV is commonly present in this region. The frequency of HEV occurrence was higher in summer than in winter. No HEV was detected in WWTP effluent samples, which indicates a low risk of environmental contamination. HEV occurrence and concentrations were lower than those of norovirus and adenovirus. The autochthonous HEV genotype 3 was found in all positive samples, but a strain of the non-endemic and highly pathogenic HEV genotype I was isolated in one sample, highlighting the possibility of environmental circulation of this genotype. A porcine fecal marker (porcine adenovirus) was not detected in HEV positive samples, indicating that swine are not the direct source of HEV present in wastewater. Further investigations will be necessary to determine the reservoirs and the routes of dissemination of HEV.
Keywords
Adenoviruses, Human/genetics, Adenoviruses, Human/isolation & purification, Adenoviruses, Porcine/genetics, Adenoviruses, Porcine/isolation & purification, Animals, Chemical Fractionation, Feces/virology, Filtration/methods, Hepatitis E virus/genetics, Hepatitis E virus/isolation & purification, Humans, Norovirus/genetics, Norovirus/isolation & purification, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Reproducibility of Results, Seasons, Swine, Switzerland, Waste Disposal, Fluid, Waste Water/virology, Water Microbiology, Adenovirus, HEV, Hepatitis E, Norovirus, Wastewater, qPCR
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
04/07/2013 13:55
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:04
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