The well-being of Swiss general internal medicine residents.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_2512D28FB068
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
The well-being of Swiss general internal medicine residents.
Journal
Swiss medical weekly
Author(s)
Zumbrunn B., Stalder O., Limacher A., Ballmer P.E., Bassetti S., Battegay E., Beer J.H., Brändle M., Genné D., Hayoz D., Henzen C., Huber L.C., Petignat P.A., Reny J.L., Vollenweider P., Aujesky D.
ISSN
1424-3997 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0036-7672
Publication state
Published
Issued date
01/06/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
150
Pages
w20255
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Physician well-being has an impact on productivity and quality of care. Residency training is a particularly stressful period.
To assess the well-being of general internal medicine (GIM) residents and its association with personal and work-related factors.
We conducted an anonymous electronic survey among GIM residents from 13 Swiss teaching hospitals. We explored the association between a reduced well-being (≥5 points based on the Physician Well-Being Index [PWBI]) and personal and work-related factors using multivariable mixed-effects logistic regression.
The response rate was 54% (472/880). Overall, 19% of residents had a reduced well-being, 60% felt burned out (emotional exhaustion), 47% were worried that their work was hardening them emotionally (depersonalisation), and 21% had career choice regret. Age (odds ratio [OR] 1.19, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05–1.34), working hours per week (OR 1.04 per hour, 95% CI 1.01–1.07) and <2.5 rewarding work hours per day (OR 3.73, 95% CI 2.01–6.92) were associated with reduced well-being. Administrative workload and satisfaction with the electronic medical record were not. We found significant correlations between PWBI score and job satisfaction (rs = -0.54, p<0.001), medical errors (rs = 0.18, p<0.001), suicidal ideation (rs = 0.12, p = 0.009) and the intention to leave clinical practice (rs = 0.38, p <0.001) CONCLUSIONS: Approximately 20% of Swiss GIM residents appear to have a reduced well-being and many show signs of distress or have career choice regret. Having few hours of rewarding work and a high number of working hours were the most important modifiable predictors of reduced well-being. Healthcare organisations have an ethical responsibility to implement interventions to improve physician well-being.
Pubmed
Open Access
Yes
Create date
06/07/2020 13:49
Last modification date
03/06/2021 6:37
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