Coinfections between Persistent Parasitic Neglected Tropical Diseases and Viral Infections among Prisoners from Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_23F65EEB3740
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Coinfections between Persistent Parasitic Neglected Tropical Diseases and Viral Infections among Prisoners from Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America
Journal
J Trop Med
Author(s)
Da Silva Santos L., Wolff H., Chappuis F., Albajar-Vinas P., Vitoria M., Tran N. T., Baggio S., Togni G., Vuilleumier N., Girardin F., Negro F., Getaz L.
ISSN
1687-9686 (Print)
ISSN-L
1687-9686
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2018
Volume
2018
Pages
7218534
Language
english
Notes
Da Silva Santos, Lilian
Wolff, Hans
Chappuis, Francois
Albajar-Vinas, Pedro
Vitoria, Marco
Tran, Nguyen-Toan
Baggio, Stephanie
Togni, Giuseppe
Vuilleumier, Nicolas
Girardin, Francois
Negro, Francesco
Getaz, Laurent
eng
001/World Health Organization/International
Egypt
J Trop Med. 2018 Nov 6;2018:7218534. doi: 10.1155/2018/7218534. eCollection 2018.
Abstract
In Swiss prisons, more than 70% of detained people are foreigners and over one-third originate from sub-Saharan Africa or Latin America. These two regions are endemic for various tropical diseases and viral infections, which persist after migration to nonendemic countries. Parasitic infections (schistosomiasis; strongyloidiasis) and cooccurrent viral infections (HIV, hepatitis B (HBV), and hepatitis C (HCV)) are especially of concern for clinical care but have been neglected in empirical research. These diseases often remain silent for years before causing complications, especially if they occur concomitantly. Our research aimed to study the prevalence rates and coinfections of two neglected tropical diseases, namely, Strongyloides stercoralis and Schistosoma sp. and viral infections among sub-Saharan Africans (SSA) and Latin Americans (LA) in Switzerland's largest pretrial prison. We carried out a cross-sectional prevalence study using a standardized questionnaire and serological testing. Among the 201 participants, 85.6% were SSA and 14.4% LA. We found the following prevalence ratios: 3.5% of HIV (4.1% in SSA, 0% in LA), 12.4% of chronic HBV (14.5% in SSA, 0% in LA), 2.0% of viraemic HCV (1.7% in SSA, 3.4% in LA), and 8.0% of strongyloidiasis (8.1% in SSA, 6.9% in LA). The serological prevalence of schistosomiasis among SSA was 20.3% (not endemic in Latin America). Two infections were simultaneously detected in SSA: 4.7% were coinfected with schistosomiasis and chronic HBV. Four other coinfections were detected among SSA: schistosomiasis-HIV, HIV-chronic HBV, HIV-HCV, and schistosomiasis-strongyloidiasis. To conclude, the high prevalence rates of persistent viral and parasitic infections and their potential coinfections among SSA and LA detained migrants highlight the need to implement control strategies and programs that reach people in detention centers in nonendemic countries.
Pubmed
Create date
10/02/2021 12:32
Last modification date
11/02/2021 7:26
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