Effects of Pre-Term Birth on the Cardio-Respiratory Responses to Hypoxic Exercise in Children.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_23C630F11789
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Effects of Pre-Term Birth on the Cardio-Respiratory Responses to Hypoxic Exercise in Children.
Journal
Life
Author(s)
Narang B.J., Manferdelli G., Kepic K., Sotiridis A., Osredkar D., Bourdillon N., Millet G.P., Debevec T.
ISSN
2075-1729 (Print)
ISSN-L
2075-1729
Publication state
Published
Issued date
06/01/2022
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
12
Number
1
Pages
79
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Pre-term birth is associated with numerous cardio-respiratory sequelae in children. Whether these impairments impact the responses to exercise in normoxia or hypoxia remains to be established. Fourteen prematurely-born (PREM) (Mean ± SD; gestational age 29 ± 2 weeks; age 9.5 ± 0.3 years), and 15 full-term children (CONT) (gestational age 39 ± 1 weeks; age 9.7 ± 0.9 years), underwent incremental exercise tests to exhaustion in normoxia (FiO <sub>2</sub> = 20.9%) and normobaric hypoxia (FiO <sub>2</sub> = 13.2%) on a cycle ergometer. Cardio-respiratory variables were measured throughout. Peak power output was higher in normoxia than hypoxia (103 ± 17 vs. 77 ± 18 W; p < 0.001), with no difference between CONT and PREM (94 ± 23 vs. 86 ± 19 W; p = 0.154). VO <sub>2</sub> peak was higher in normoxia than hypoxia in CONT (50.8 ± 7.2 vs. 43.8 ± 9.9 mL·kg <sup>-1</sup> ·min <sup>-1</sup> ; p < 0.001) but not in PREM (48.1 ± 7.5 vs. 45.0 ± 6.8 mL·kg <sup>-1</sup> ·min <sup>-1</sup> ; p = 0.137; interaction p = 0.044). Higher peak heart rate (187 ± 11 vs. 180 ± 10 bpm; p = 0.005) and lower stroke volume (72 ± 13 vs. 77 ± 14 mL; p = 0.004) were observed in normoxia versus hypoxia in CONT, with no such differences in PREM (p = 0.218 and >0.999, respectively). In conclusion, premature birth does not appear to exacerbate the negative effect of hypoxia on exercise capacity in children. Further research is warranted to identify whether prematurity elicits a protective effect, and to clarify the potential underlying mechanisms.
Keywords
altitude, children, exercise capacity, hypoxia, prematurity
Pubmed
Open Access
Yes
Create date
31/01/2022 12:38
Last modification date
24/02/2022 7:33
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