The bidirectional relationship between anxiety disorders and circulating levels of inflammatory markers: Results from a large longitudinal population-based study.

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State: Serval
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
Serval ID
serval:BIB_2377C26C56E4
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
The bidirectional relationship between anxiety disorders and circulating levels of inflammatory markers: Results from a large longitudinal population-based study.
Journal
Depression and anxiety
Author(s)
Glaus J., von Känel R., Lasserre A.M., Strippoli M.F., Vandeleur C.L., Castelao E., Gholam-Rezaee M., Marangoni C., Wagner E.N., Marques-Vidal P., Waeber G., Vollenweider P., Preisig M., Merikangas K.R.
ISSN
1520-6394 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1091-4269
Publication state
Published
Issued date
04/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
35
Number
4
Pages
360-371
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Although there has been abundant research on chronic low-grade inflammation as a potential mechanism underlying the link between mood disorders and cardiovascular risk, less is known about the role of inflammatory factors and anxiety disorders. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the bi-directional associations between inflammatory markers including interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) with anxiety disorders and its subgroups.
The sample consisted of 3,113 participants (53.7% women; mean age: 51.0, S.D. 8.8 years), randomly selected from the general population, who underwent comprehensive somatic and psychiatric evaluations at baseline and follow-up (mean follow-up duration = 5.5 years, S.D. 0.6). Anxiety disorders were assessed with semistructured diagnostic interviews. Inflammatory biomarkers were analyzed in fasting blood samples.
After adjustment for potential confounders, current anxiety disorders (β = 0.09, 95% CI 0.00-0.17) and agoraphobia (β = 0.25, 95% CI: 0.07-0.43) at baseline were associated with a steeper increase of hsCRP levels over the follow-up period. Current posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was associated with a lower increase of IL-6 levels over the follow-up period (β = -0.52, 95% CI: -1.00/-0.04). There was no evidence for an association between inflammation markers at baseline and anxiety disorders at follow-up.
The prospective association between agoraphobia at baseline and hsCRP levels over the follow-up period suggests that chronic low-grade inflammation may be a consequence of this condition. The decrease in IL-6 in PTSD also requires further investigation. No evidence was found for chronic low-grade inflammation as a predictor of future anxiety disorders.
Keywords
Adult, Agoraphobia/blood, Anxiety Disorders/blood, Biomarkers/blood, C-Reactive Protein, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Inflammation/blood, Interleukin-6/blood, Male, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies, Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/blood, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood, C-reactive protein, agoraphobia, anxiety disorders, body mass index, cytokines, panic disorder, social phobia
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
18/12/2017 12:31
Last modification date
08/05/2019 15:47
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