Representations of personalised medicine in family medicine: a qualitative analysis.

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Version: Final published version
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_2368996C859D
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Representations of personalised medicine in family medicine: a qualitative analysis.
Journal
BMC primary care
Author(s)
Boyer M.S., Widmer D., Cohidon C., Desvergne B., Cornuz J., Guessous I., Cerqui D.
ISSN
2731-4553 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2731-4553
Publication state
Published
Issued date
01/03/2022
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
23
Number
1
Pages
37
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
The promise of personalised medicine (PM) to transform healthcare has sparked great enthusiasm in the last years. Yet, its lack of consensus around the nature and scope of the concept has ended in terminological confusion amongst the users in primary care. We aimed to investigate the perceptions of doctors and their patients in response to this evolving concept. This present article focuses on the general understanding of personalised medicine, underlining the confusion over the concept.
Semi-structured comprehensive interviews were conducted with 10 general practitioners (GPs) and 10 of their patients. The purposive sampling took into account the doctor's age, sex, and place of practice (rural/urban); each doctor recruited one patient of the same age and sex. Each interview began with the same open-ended question about the participant's knowledge of the topic, after which a working definition was provided to continue the discussion. Using the grounded theory method, the analysis consisted of open coding, axial coding and selective coding.
From our present analysis focusing on the general understanding of PM, three main themes representing the concept emerged. The first two representations being "centred on the person as a whole" and "focused on alternative and complementary methods", in which the therapeutic relationship was stated as key. The third theme "medicine open to innovation" involved the few participants who had a good understanding of the concept and could associate personalised medicine with genomics. For those who value therapeutic relationship, the risks of accepting innovation could result in "fast-food" medicine and interpersonal barriers.
PM is predominantly unfamiliar in family medicine. It is misinterpreted as a holistic or integrative type of medicine. This semantic confusion probably lies in the choice of the label "personalised" or from the lack of a uniform definition for the term.
Keywords
Conceptual confusion, Definition, Family medicine, Health concept, Personalised medicine, Representation
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
07/03/2022 11:00
Last modification date
23/11/2022 7:08
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