Social protection expenditure on health in later life in 20 European countries: Spending more to reduce health inequalities.

Details

Ressource 1Request a copy Under embargo until 15/11/2024.
UNIL restricted access
State: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
License: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_233894B48F35
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Social protection expenditure on health in later life in 20 European countries: Spending more to reduce health inequalities.
Journal
Social science & medicine
Author(s)
Sieber S., Orsholits D., Cheval B., Ihle A., Kelly-Irving M., Delpierre C., Burton-Jeangros C., Cullati S.
ISSN
1873-5347 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0277-9536
Publication state
Published
Issued date
01/2022
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
292
Pages
114569
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
This study aims to examine whether higher social protection expenditure reduces the negative association of life-course socioeconomic disadvantages with subjective and objective health status and trajectories in later life.
We used SHARE data from participants living in 20 European countries aged 50 to 96. Seven waves allowed to examine the trajectories of health inequalities in later life. We used linear mixed-effects models stratified by sex to examine the association between life-course socioeconomic disadvantage and subjective (self-rated health, SRH, N = 55,443) and objective (grip strength, N = 54,718) health. Cross-level interactions between net social protection expenditure as percentage of gross domestic product and life-course socioeconomic disadvantage tested for the moderating effect of social expenditures on the association of disadvantage with SRH and grip strength in later life.
Higher social protection expenditure reduced socioeconomic health inequalities in both men and women for grip strength, and in women but not men for SRH. For SRH, the health-inequality-reducing effect of social protection expenditure became weaker with increasing age. This was not observed in grip strength. Some separate expenditure functions (disability, family and children) were found to have inequality-widening effects in men's and women's SRH, which were either offset or overcompensated by the other functions. No inequality-widening effects were observed in grip strength.
Higher social spending reduces life-course socioeconomic inequalities in women's subjective health and in men's and women's objective health. However, some specific social protection policies may have the unintentional effect of increasing inequalities in people's evaluation of their own health.
Keywords
Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Child, Female, Health Expenditures, Health Status, Health Status Disparities, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Public Policy, Social Class, Socioeconomic Factors, Ageing, Grip strength, Longitudinal, SHARE, Self-rated health, Social protection expenditure, Trajectory
Pubmed
Open Access
Yes
Funding(s)
European Commission
Swiss National Science Foundation / 51NF40-160590
Swiss National Science Foundation / PZ00P1_180040
Create date
26/11/2021 16:44
Last modification date
09/04/2022 6:33
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