Early childhood caries in Switzerland: a marker of social inequalities.

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
Serval ID
serval:BIB_20BF98915BF0
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Early childhood caries in Switzerland: a marker of social inequalities.
Journal
Bmc Oral Health
Author(s)
Baggio S., Abarca M., Bodenmann P., Gehri M., Madrid C.
ISSN
1472-6831 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1472-6831
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
15
Pages
82
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal ArticlePublication Status: epublish
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Early childhood caries (ECC) is a marker of social inequalities worldwide because disadvantaged children are more likely to develop caries than their peers. This study aimed to define the ECC prevalence among children living in French-speaking Switzerland, where data on this topic were scarce, and to assess whether ECC was an early marker of social inequalities in this country.
METHODS: The study took place between 2010 and 2012 in the primary care facility of Lausanne Children's Hospital. We clinically screened 856 children from 36 to 71 months old for ECC, and their caregivers (parents or legal guardians) filled in a questionnaire including items on socioeconomic background (education, occupation, income, literacy and immigration status), dental care and dietary habits. Prevalence rates, prevalence ratios and logistic regressions were calculated.
RESULTS: The overall ECC prevalence was 24.8 %. ECC was less frequent among children from higher socioeconomic backgrounds than children from lower ones (prevalence ratios ≤ 0.58).
CONCLUSIONS: This study reported a worrying prevalence rate of ECC among children from 36 to 71 months old, living in French-speaking Switzerland. ECC appears to be a good marker of social inequalities as disadvantaged children, whether from Swiss or immigrant backgrounds, were more likely to have caries than their less disadvantaged peers. Specific preventive interventions regarding ECC are needed for all disadvantaged children, whether immigrants or Swiss.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
24/08/2015 16:37
Last modification date
20/08/2019 12:57
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