Underreporting of needlestick and sharps injuries among healthcare workers in a Swiss University Hospital.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_209E705FACB7
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Underreporting of needlestick and sharps injuries among healthcare workers in a Swiss University Hospital.
Journal
Swiss Medical Weekly
Author(s)
Voide C., Darling K.E., Kenfak-Foguena A., Erard V., Cavassini M., Lazor-Blanchet C.
ISSN
1424-3997 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0036-7672
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2012
Volume
142
Number
w13523
Pages
1-7
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Comparative Study ; Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To determine 1) rates of needlestick and sharps injuries (NSSIs) not reported to occupational health services, 2) reasons for underreporting and 3) awareness of reporting procedures in a Swiss university hospital.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: We surveyed 6,367 employees having close clinical contact with patients or patient specimens. The questionnaire covered age, sex, occupation, years spent in occupation, history of NSSI during the preceding twelve months, NSSI reporting, barriers to reporting and knowledge of reporting procedures.
RESULTS: 2,778 questionnaires were returned (43.6%) of which 2,691 were suitable for analysis. 260/2,691 employees (9.7%) had sustained at least one NSSI during the preceding twelve months. NSSIs were more frequent among nurses (49.2%) and doctors performing invasive procedures (IPs) (36.9%). NSSI rate by occupation was 8.6% for nurses, 19% for doctors and 1.3% for domestic staff. Of the injured respondents, 73.1% reported all events, 12.3% some and 14.6% none. 42.7% of doctors performing invasive procedures (IPs) underreported NSSIs and represented 58.6% of underreported events. Estimation that transmission risk was low (87.1%) and perceived lack of time (34.3%) were the most common reasons for non-reporting. Regarding reporting procedures, 80.1% of respondents knew to contact occupational health services.
CONCLUSION: Doctors performing IPs have high rates of NSSI and, through self-assessment that infection transmission risk is low or perceived lack of time, high rates of underreporting. If individual risk analyses underestimate the real risk, such underreporting represents a missed opportunity for post-exposure prophylaxis and identification of hazardous procedures. Doctors' training in NSSI reporting merits re-evaluation.
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational/statistics & numerical data, Adolescent, Adult, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Hospitals, University/statistics & numerical data, Humans, Male, Medical Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data, Middle Aged, Needlestick Injuries/epidemiology, Occupational Diseases/epidemiology, Prevalence, Questionnaires, Retrospective Studies, Risk Assessment/methods, Risk Factors, Safety Management/utilization, Switzerland/epidemiology, Young Adult
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
18/06/2012 9:05
Last modification date
09/04/2020 6:20
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