Psychiatric disorders, suicidality, and personality among young men by sexual orientation.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_1FE5A2B1A9A5
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Psychiatric disorders, suicidality, and personality among young men by sexual orientation.
Journal
European Psychiatry
Author(s)
Wang J., Dey M., Soldati L., Weiss M.G., Gmel G., Mohler-Kuo M.
ISSN
1778-3585 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0924-9338
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2014
Volume
29
Number
8
Pages
514-522
Language
english
Abstract
Personality and its potential role in mediating risk of psychiatric disorders and suicidality are assessed by sexual orientation, using data collected among young Swiss men (n=5875) recruited while presenting for mandatory military conscription. Mental health outcomes were analyzed by sexual attraction using logistic regression, controlling for five-factor model personality traits and socio-demographics. Homo/bisexual men demonstrated the highest scores for neuroticism-anxiety but the lowest for sociability and sensation seeking, with no differences for aggression-hostility. Among homo/bisexual men, 10.2% fulfilled diagnostic criteria for major depression in the past 2weeks, 10.8% for ADHD in the past 12months, 13.8% for lifetime anti-social personality disorder (ASPD), and 6.0% attempted suicide in the past 12months. Upon adjusting (AOR) for personality traits, their odds ratios (OR) for major depression (OR=4.78, 95% CI 2.81-8.14; AOR=1.46, 95% CI 0.80-2.65) and ADHD (OR=2.17, 95% CI=1.31-3.58; AOR=1.00, 95% CI 0.58-1.75) lost statistical significance, and the odds ratio for suicide attempt was halved (OR=5.10, 95% CI 2.57-10.1; AOR=2.42, 95% CI 1.16-5.02). There are noteworthy differences in personality traits by sexual orientation, and much of the increased mental morbidity appears to be accounted for by such underlying differences, with important implications for etiology and treatment.
Keywords
Bisexuality/psychology, Depressive Disorder, Major/epidemiology, Depressive Disorder, Major/etiology, Homosexuality, Male/psychology, Humans, Male, Mental Disorders/epidemiology, Mental Disorders/etiology, Personality, Risk Factors, Sexual Behavior/psychology, Suicide, Attempted/psychology, Suicide, Attempted/statistics & numerical data, Switzerland/epidemiology, Young Adult
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
04/12/2015 13:39
Last modification date
20/08/2019 13:55
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