Early vitamin K deficiency bleeding after maternal phenobarbital intake: management of massive intracranial haemorrhage by minimal surgical intervention.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_1F894807EF2F
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Early vitamin K deficiency bleeding after maternal phenobarbital intake: management of massive intracranial haemorrhage by minimal surgical intervention.
Journal
European journal of pediatrics
Author(s)
Renzulli P., Tuchschmid P., Eich G., Fanconi S., Schwöbel M.G.
ISSN
0340-6199
Publication state
Published
Issued date
1998
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
157
Number
8
Pages
663-5
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article - Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Vitamin K deficiency bleeding within the first 24 h of life is caused in most cases by maternal drug intake (e.g. coumarins, anticonvulsants, tuberculostatics) during pregnancy. Haemorrhage is often life-threatening and usually not prevented by vitamin K prophylaxis at birth. We report a case of severe intracranial bleeding at birth secondary to phenobarbital-induced vitamin K deficiency and traumatic delivery. Burr hole trepanations of the skull were performed and the subdural haematoma was evacuated. Despite the severe prognosis, the infant showed an unexpected good recovery. At the age of 3 years, neurological examinations were normal as was the EEG at the age of 9 months. CT showed close to normal intracranial structures. CONCLUSION: This case report stresses the importance of antenatal vitamin K prophylaxis and the consideration of a primary Caesarean section in maternal vitamin K deficiency states and demonstrates the successful management of massive subdural haemorrhage by a limited surgical approach.
Keywords
Anticonvulsants, Cesarean Section, Epilepsy, Generalized, Female, Hematoma, Subdural, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Phenobarbital, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Treatment Outcome, Trephining, Vitamin K Deficiency
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
25/01/2008 10:07
Last modification date
20/08/2019 12:55
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