Cerebral and Muscle Oxygenation during Repeated Shuttle Run Sprints with Hypoventilation.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_1F6399A07E40
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Cerebral and Muscle Oxygenation during Repeated Shuttle Run Sprints with Hypoventilation.
Journal
International journal of sports medicine
Author(s)
Woorons X., Dupuy O., Mucci P., Millet G.P., Pichon A.
ISSN
1439-3964 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0172-4622
Publication state
Published
Issued date
05/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
40
Number
6
Pages
376-384
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Ten highly-trained Jiu-Jitsu fighters performed 2 repeated-sprint sessions, each including 2 sets of 8 x ~6 s back-and-forth running sprints on a tatami. One session was carried out with normal breathing (RSN) and the other with voluntary hypoventilation at low lung volume (RSH-VHL). Prefrontal and vastus lateralis muscle oxyhemoglobin ([O <sub>2</sub> Hb]) and deoxyhemoglobin ([HHb]) were monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy. Arterial oxygen saturation (SpO <sub>2</sub> ), heart rate (HR), gas exchange and maximal blood lactate concentration ([La] <sub>max</sub> ) were also assessed. SpO <sub>2</sub> was significantly lower in RSH-VHL than in RSN whereas there was no difference in HR. Muscle oxygenation was not different between conditions during the entire exercise. On the other hand, in RSH-VHL, cerebral oxygenation was significantly lower than in RSN (-6.1±5.4 vs-1.5±6.6 µm). Oxygen uptake was also higher during the recovery periods whereas [La] <sub>max</sub> tended to be lower in RSH-VHL. The time of the sprints was not different between conditions. This study shows that repeated shuttle-run sprints with VHL has a limited impact on muscle deoxygenation but induces a greater fall in cerebral oxygenation compared with normal breathing conditions. Despite this phenomenon, performance is not impaired, probably because of a higher oxygen uptake during the recovery periods following sprints.
Keywords
Athletic Performance/physiology, Brain/metabolism, Heart Rate, Hemoglobins/metabolism, Humans, Hypoventilation, Lactic Acid/blood, Muscle, Skeletal/metabolism, Oxygen/blood, Oxygen Consumption/physiology, Oxyhemoglobins/metabolism, Perception, Physical Exertion, Pulmonary Gas Exchange, Respiration, Running/physiology, Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
15/04/2019 8:36
Last modification date
21/08/2019 6:34
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