The effects of induced sadness, stress sensitivity, negative urgency, and gender in laboratory gambling

Details

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
License: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_1F4AB72BA0CA
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
The effects of induced sadness, stress sensitivity, negative urgency, and gender in laboratory gambling
Journal
International Gambling Studies
Author(s)
Canale Natale, Rubaltelli Enrico, Calcagnì Antonio, Vieno Alessio, Giovannoni Marta, Devos Gaëtan, Billieux Joël
ISSN
1445-9795
1479-4276
Publication state
In Press
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Pages
1-24
Language
english
Abstract
Previous research indicates that the invigorating effect of stress sensitivity on gambling behavior might be moderated by individual differences. The current preregistered study tested whether gender and negative urgency (i.e. an emotion-related impulsivity trait) moderate the relationship between perceived stress and laboratory gambling following experimentally induced sadness. One hundred twenty college students were randomly assigned to a sadness versus a control condition before completing a laboratory gambling task. Although the distribution of the main study variables forced us to slightly deviate from the preregistered data analysis plan, we were able to show that heightened stress sensitivity affects gambling behavior and that this effect differs by gender (but not in terms of negative urgency) under conditions of sadness versus neutral mood. Men with high stress sensitivity gambled more money and more frequently selected the riskier betting option in the sadness condition, whereas women with heightened stress sensitivity display the same pattern in the neutral condition. Our study is relevant from a methodological standpoint and answers recent calls for endorsing open-science practices in gambling research. Findings also suggest that more research into female gambling is warranted and that emotion-regulation skills should be a central component of problem gambling prevention.
Keywords
Applied Psychology
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
09/01/2022 20:51
Last modification date
15/01/2022 7:31
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