Molecular and Mass Spectrometry Detection and Identification of Causative Agents of Bloodstream Infections

Details

Ressource 1Download: 10.11289781555819071.pdf (1850.19 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
Serval ID
serval:BIB_1ABBF674D970
Type
A part of a book
Publication sub-type
Chapter: chapter ou part
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Molecular and Mass Spectrometry Detection and Identification of Causative Agents of Bloodstream Infections
Title of the book
Molecular Microbiology
Author(s)
Opota Onya, Jaton Katia, Prod'hom Guy, Greub Gilbert
Publisher
American Society of Microbiology
Address of publication
Washington, DC
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2016
Editor
David Persing, Fred Tenover, Randall Hayden, Margareta Leven
Chapter
26
Pages
336-361
Edition
3e édition
Language
english
Abstract
Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are severe diseases associated with a high morbidity and mortality, which increases with the delay until administration of the first appropriate antibiotic (1–8). For this reason, empiric treatments made of broad-range anti-infectious compounds or made of a combination of antimicrobials are started immediately after the sampling of blood bottles. BSIs can be caused by various microorganisms. In the absence of microbiological documentation, physicians suspect a BSI on the basis of clinical symptoms, which trigger the start of empirical treatments. The clinical presentations are multiple and include fever or hypothermia, increases in heart rate, change in inflammatory variable (C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, and white blood cell count increase), and organ failure (2, 9). These symptoms are generally nonspecific and only suggest bloodstream dissemination. Empirical treatments are made of broad-spectrum antibiotics on the basis of the clinical and epidemiological data, but this does not exclude any risk of inappropriate initial treatment.
Keywords
Bloodstream infection, clinical microbiology, bacteriology, molecular diactostic, MALDI-TOF MS, PCR
Open Access
Yes
Create date
12/01/2018 15:32
Last modification date
21/08/2019 6:08
Usage data