Body mass index: comparing mean values and prevalence rates from telephone and examination surveys.

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State: Public
Version: author
Serval ID
serval:BIB_19CF4F18EF24
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Body mass index: comparing mean values and prevalence rates from telephone and examination surveys.
Journal
Revue d'épidémiologie et de santé publique
Author(s)
Paccaud F., Wietlisbach V., Rickenbach M.
ISSN
0398-7620
ISSN-L
0398-7620
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2001
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
49
Number
1
Pages
33-40
Language
english
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Cost effective means of assessing the levels of risk factors in the population have to be defined in order to monitor these factors over time and across populations. This study is aimed at analyzing the difference in population estimates of the mean levels of body mass index (BMI) and the prevalences of overweight, between health examination survey and telephone survey. METHODS: The study compares the results of two health surveys, one by telephone (N=820) and the other by physical examination (N=1318). The two surveys, based on independent random samples of the population, were carried out over the same period (1992-1993) in the same population (canton of Vaud, Switzerland). RESULTS: Overall participation rates were 67% and 53% for the health interview survey (HIS) and the health examination survey (HES) respectively. In the HIS, the reporting rate was over 98% for weight and height values. Self-reported weight was on average lower than measured weight, by 2.2 kg in men and 3.5 kg in women, while self-reported height was on average greater than measured height, by 1.2 cm in men and 1.9 cm in women. As a result, in comparison to HES, HIS led to substantially lower mean levels of BMI, and to a reduction of the prevalence rates of obesity (BMI>30 kg/m(2)) by more than a half. These differences are larger for women than for men. CONCLUSION: The two surveys were based on different sampling procedures. However, this difference in design is unlikely to explain the systematic bias observed between self-reported and measured values for height and weight. This bias entails the overall validity of BMI assessment from telephone surveys.
Keywords
Adult, Age Distribution, Aged, Bias (Epidemiology), Body Height, Body Mass Index, Body Weight, Data Collection, Female, Health Surveys, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Physical Examination, Prevalence, Questionnaires, Research Design, Sampling Studies, Sex Distribution, Switzerland, Telephone
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
14/03/2008 11:20
Last modification date
07/04/2020 7:08
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