Use of a renal-specific oral supplement by haemodialysis patients with low protein intake does not increase the need for phosphate binders and may prevent a decline in nutritional status and quality of life.

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Ressource 1Download: serval:BIB_198F5802EB15.P001 (328.04 [Ko])
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Serval ID
serval:BIB_198F5802EB15
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Use of a renal-specific oral supplement by haemodialysis patients with low protein intake does not increase the need for phosphate binders and may prevent a decline in nutritional status and quality of life.
Journal
Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation
Author(s)
Fouque D., McKenzie J., de Mutsert R., Azar R., Teta D., Plauth M., Cano N.
Working group(s)
Renilon Multicentre Trial Study Group
Contributor(s)
Schlawin H., Burnier M., Teta D., Abokasem A., Moray W., Aladib M., Bony C., Broyet C., Chauveau P., Chazot C., Delcroix C., Depuis E., Rist E., Guy JP., Hadj El Mrabet A., Heyani A., Nemmar F., Vendrely B.
ISSN
1460-2385 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0931-0509
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2008
Volume
23
Number
9
Pages
2902-2910
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Multicenter Study ; Randomized Controlled Trial ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Protein-energy wasting is a frequent and debilitating condition in maintenance dialysis. We randomly tested if an energy-dense, phosphate-restricted, renal-specific oral supplement could maintain adequate nutritional intake and prevent malnutrition in maintenance haemodialysis patients with insufficient intake.
METHODS: Eighty-six patients were assigned to a standard care (CTRL) group or were prescribed two 125-ml packs of Renilon 7.5(R) daily for 3 months (SUPP). Dietary intake, serum (S) albumin, prealbumin, protein nitrogen appearance (nPNA), C-reactive protein, subjective global assessment (SGA) and quality of life (QOL) were recorded at baseline and after 3 months.
RESULTS: While intention to treat analysis (ITT) did not reveal strong statistically significant changes in dietary intake between groups, per protocol (PP) analysis showed that the SUPP group increased protein (P < 0.01) and energy (P < 0.01) intakes. In contrast, protein and energy intakes further deteriorated in the CTRL group (PP). Although there was no difference in serum albumin and prealbumin changes between groups, in the total population serum albumin and prealbumin changes were positively associated with the increment in protein intake (r = 0.29, P = 0.01 and r = 0.27, P = 0.02, respectively). The SUPP group did not increase phosphate intake, phosphataemia remained unaffected, and the use of phosphate binders remained stable or decreased. The SUPP group exhibited improved SGA and QOL (P < 0.05).
CONCLUSION: This study shows that providing maintenance haemodialysis patients with insufficient intake with a renal-specific oral supplement may prevent deterioration in nutritional indices and QOL without increasing the need for phosphate binders.
Keywords
Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Dietary Proteins/administration & dosage, Dietary Supplements/analysis, Female, Health Status Indicators, Humans, Kidney/drug effects, Male, Middle Aged, Nutritional Status, Phosphate-Binding Proteins/administration & dosage, Protein-Energy Malnutrition/prevention & control, Quality of Life, Renal Dialysis, Serum Albumin/analysis
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
03/10/2009 8:52
Last modification date
25/09/2019 7:08
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