New mechanisms of viral persistence in primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_189901F3B08D
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
New mechanisms of viral persistence in primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection
Journal
Journal of Biological Regulators and Homeostatic Agents
Author(s)
Soudeyns  H., Pantaleo  G.
ISSN
0393-974X (Print)
Publication state
Published
Issued date
06/1997
Volume
11
Number
1-2
Pages
37-9
Notes
Journal Article
Review --- Old month value: Jan-Jun
Abstract
Viruses, including the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), have evolved multiple strategies to overcome host immune defenses, allowing them to persist in the host. Molecular and cellular approaches were simultaneously used to provide sensitive and unbiased delineation of the diversity and dynamics of the immune response, and to study the relative compartimentalization of HIV-specific CTL clones in patients undergoing primary HIV infection. This approach revealed that some HIV-specific CTL clones can be deleted in presence of high levels of antigen, a phenomenon analogous to high-dose tolerance or clonal exhaustion described in murine models of persistent viral infections. Also, HIV-specific CTL clones were found to accumulate preferentially in peripheral blood as compared to lymph nodes, even though the large majority of viral replication during primary HIV infection takes place within lymph nodes. These two mechanisms may decrease the effectiveness of the host cell-mediated immune responses, and favor the establishment of virus persistence during primary HIV infection.
Keywords
Animals Antigen Presentation *Cytotoxicity, Immunologic HIV Infections/*immunology *Hiv-1 Humans *Immunity, Cellular Mice T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic/*immunology
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
25/01/2008 15:14
Last modification date
20/08/2019 12:49
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