Hyperventilation in anticipatory music performance anxiety

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State: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
Serval ID
serval:BIB_1839F71692B8
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Hyperventilation in anticipatory music performance anxiety
Journal
Psychosomatic Medicine
Author(s)
Studer Regina, Danuser Brigitta, Hildebrandt Horst, Arial Marc, Wild Pascal, Gomez Patrick
ISSN
1534-7796 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0033-3174
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
74
Number
7
Pages
773-782
Language
english
Abstract
Objectives and Methods: Self-report studies have shown an association between music performance anxiety (MPA) and hyperventilation complaints. However, hyperventilation was never assessed physiologically in MPA. This study investigated the self-reported affective experience, self-reported physiological symptoms, and cardiorespiratory variables including partial pressure of end-tidal CO(2) (Petco(2)), which is an indicator for hyperventilation, in 67 music students before a private and a public performance. The response coherence between these response domains was also investigated.ResultsFrom the private to the public session, the intensity of all self-report variables increased (all p values < .001). As predicted, the higher the musician's usual MPA level, the larger were these increases (p values < .10). With the exception of Petco(2), the main cardiorespiratory variables also increased from the private to the public session (p values < .05). These increases were not modulated by the usual MPA level (p values > .10). Petco(2) showed a unique response pattern reflected by an MPA-by-session interaction (p < .01): it increased from the private to the public session for musicians with low MPA levels and decreased for musicians with high MPA levels. Self-reported physiological symptoms were related to the self-reported affective experience (p values < .05) rather than to physiological measures (p values > .17).ConclusionsThese findings show for the first time how respiration is stimulated before a public performance in music students with different MPA levels. The hypothesis of a hyperventilation tendency in high-performance-anxious musicians is supported. The response coherence between physiological symptoms and physiological activation is weak.
Keywords
Music , Students , Hyperventilation , Anxiety , Task Performance and Analysis , Stress, Psychological , Switzerland
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
16/08/2012 15:29
Last modification date
20/08/2019 12:48
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