Beliefs and needs of fathers of newborns hospitalised in a neonatal unit: A descriptive correlational study.

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License: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_15EDF128E21B
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Beliefs and needs of fathers of newborns hospitalised in a neonatal unit: A descriptive correlational study.
Journal
Australian critical care
Author(s)
Rio L., Donadeo Fadda M., Lambert S., Ramelet A.S.
ISSN
1036-7314 (Print)
ISSN-L
1036-7314
Publication state
Published
Issued date
03/2022
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
35
Number
2
Pages
167-173
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Transition to parenthood is a wonderful yet stressful period especially when it involves the newborn's hospitalisation. To support and facilitate this transition, it is essential to understand parental beliefs and needs. The father's perspective remains an understudied yet fundamental question.
The objective of the study was to measure beliefs and needs of fathers of newborns hospitalised in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and their correlations with sociodemographic variables.
Fathers with a newborn hospitalised for 4-15 days in a level III NICU in Western Switzerland completed the NICU Parental Beliefs Scale and the short form of the NICU Family Needs Inventory. For each item of the NICU Family Needs Inventory, fathers also answered with regard to their satisfaction level. Additional needs were collected with an added open-ended question. Simple linear regressions were used to correlate beliefs, needs, and the sociodemographic data.
Seventy fathers were included. The average score for paternal beliefs was 68.44 (standard deviation = 10.29), indicating a good perception of their role. The majority (77%) considered all needs as very important or important, and 70% were very satisfied or satisfied. Fathers described communication as a very important, but unmet, need. Fathers' beliefs were higher in those who were not first-time fathers (71.88 ± 8.27 vs 66.06 ± 10.97, p = 0.028), who had a paternity leave (72.68 ± 10.19 vs 66.05 ± 9.68, p = 0.014), and who were of foreign nationality (71.86 ± 9.39 vs 63.85 ± 9.80, p = 0.002).
Fathers with a newborn hospitalised in the neonatal unit had good paternal beliefs. Most of the listed needs were perceived as very important and had a good level of satisfaction. Significant differences between Swiss fathers and fathers of foreign nationality were measured. Reasons of these differences should be explored in a forthcoming study.
Keywords
Fathers, Hospitalization, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Intensive Care Units, Neonatal, Male, Parents, Personal Satisfaction, Beliefs, Intensive care unit, Needs assessment, Neonatal, Personal satisfaction
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
26/05/2021 9:48
Last modification date
09/04/2022 6:33
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