La reconnaissance des objets sonores chez l'humain

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_15AD2BA44F12
Type
PhD thesis: a PhD thesis.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
La reconnaissance des objets sonores chez l'humain
Author(s)
Camen C.
Director(s)
Murray M.
Codirector(s)
Clarke S.
Institution details
Université de Lausanne, Faculté de biologie et médecine
Address
Faculté de biologie et de médecine
Université de Lausanne
UNIL - Bugnon
Rue du Bugnon 21 - bureau 4111
CH-1015 Lausanne
SUISSE
Publication state
Accepted
Issued date
2008
Language
french
Number of pages
90
Notes
REROID:R005101830
ill.
Abstract
Abstract :
This thesis investigated the spatio-temporal brain mechanisms of three processes involved in recognizing environmental sounds produced by living (animal vocalisations) and man-made (manufactured) objects: their discrimination, their plasticity, and the involvement of action representations.
Results showed rapid brain discrimination between these categories beginning at ~70ms. Then, beginning at ~150ms, effects of plasticity are observed, without any influence of the categories of sounds. Both of these processes of discrimination and repetition priming involved brain structures located in temporal and frontal lobes. Activation of brain areas BA21 and BA22 suggest an access to semantic representations and/or linked to object manipulation.
To investigate the involvement of action representations in sound recognition, analyses were restricted to sounds produced by man-made objects. Results suggest an access to representations linked to action functionally related to sound rather than to representations linked to action that produced sound. These effects occurred at ~300ms post-stimulus onset and involved differential activity brain regions attributed to the mirror neuron system. These data are discussed in regard to motor preparation of actions functionally linked to sounds.
Collectively these data showed a sequential progression of cerebral activity underlying the recognizing of environmental sounds. The processes occurred firstly in a shared network of brain areas before propagating elsewhere and/or leading to differential activity in these structures. Cerebral responses observed in this work allowed establishing a dynamic model of discrimination of sounds produced by living and man-made objects.
Create date
06/07/2010 8:54
Last modification date
20/08/2019 12:44
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