Does eccentric endurance training improve walking capacity in patients with coronary artery disease? A randomized controlled pilot study

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_1552623B13F6
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Does eccentric endurance training improve walking capacity in patients with coronary artery disease? A randomized controlled pilot study
Journal
Clin Rehabil
Author(s)
Gremeaux V., Duclay J., Deley G., Philipp J. L., Laroche D., Pousson M., Casillas J. M.
ISSN
1477-0873 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0269-2155
Publication state
Published
Issued date
07/2010
Volume
24
Number
7
Pages
590-9
Language
english
Notes
Gremeaux, V
Duclay, J
Deley, G
Philipp, J L
Laroche, D
Pousson, M
Casillas, J M
eng
Randomized Controlled Trial
England
Clin Rehabil. 2010 Jul;24(7):590-9. doi: 10.1177/0269215510362322. Epub 2010 Jun 8.
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of eccentric endurance training on exercise capacities in patients with coronary artery disease. DESIGN: Randomized parallel group controlled study. SETTING: Cardiac rehabilitation unit, Dijon University Hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Fourteen patients with stable coronary artery disease after percutaneous coronary intervention. INTERVENTION: Patients followed 15 sessions of training (1 session per day, 3 days a week), either in the concentric group, following a standard programme, or in the eccentric group, performing eccentric resistance exercises using both lower limbs on a specifically designed ergometer. MAIN OUTCOMES MEASURED: Symptom-limited Vo2, peak workload, isometric strength of leg extensor and ankle plantar flexors, distance covered during the 6-minute walk test and time to perform the 200-m fast walk test in both groups, before and after the training period. RESULTS: Patients did not report any adverse effects and were highly compliant. All measured parameters improved in eccentric and concentric group, except for 200-m fast walk test: symptom-limited Vo2 (+14.2% versus +4.6%), peak workload (+30.8% versus +19.3%), 6-minute walk test distance walked (+12.6% versus +10.1%) and leg extensor strength (+7% versus +13%) improved to a similar degree in both groups (P < 0.01); ankle plantar flexor strength improved in both groups with a significantly greater increase in the eccentric group (+17% versus +7%, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Patients with stable coronary artery disease can safely engage in eccentric endurance training, which appears to be as efficient as usual concentric training, with reduced oxygen consumption.
Keywords
Adult, Aged, Coronary Artery Disease/*rehabilitation, Exercise Therapy/*methods, Exercise Tolerance, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Pilot Projects, *Walking
Pubmed
Create date
26/11/2019 11:35
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06/05/2020 5:26
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