Molecular profiling of non-small cell lung cancer by histologic subtype

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_15429181FD94
Type
Inproceedings: an article in a conference proceedings.
Publication sub-type
Poster: Summary – with images – on one page of the results of a researche project. The summaries of the poster must be entered in "Abstract" and not "Poster".
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Molecular profiling of non-small cell lung cancer by histologic subtype
Title of the conference
50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Author(s)
Peters S, Voss A, Russell K, Millis SZ, Brambilla E
Address
Chicago, May 30-Jun 03, 2014
ISBN
0732-183X
ISSN-L
1527-7755
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2014
Volume
32
Series
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Pages
8057
Language
english
Abstract
Background: A substantial proportion of NSCLC has been shown to harbour specific molecular alterations affecting tumour proliferation and resulting in sensitivity to inhibition of the corresponding activated oncogenic pathway by targeted therapies. Comprehensive tumor profiling can diagnose such alterations and may identify new alterations opening additional treatment options for all distinct NSCLC subtypes. Methods: Over 6,700 non-small cell lung cancer cases referred to Caris Life Sciences between 2009 and 2014 were evaluated; clinical diagnoses and detailed tumor pathology were collected from referring physicians. Specific profiling was performed per physician request and included a combination of sequencing (Sanger, NGS or pyrosequencing), protein expression (IHC), gene amplification/rearrangement (CISH or FISH), and/or RNA fragment analysis within potential cancer-related genes and pathways. Results: Patients were grouped into cohorts according to histological subtype - adenocarcinoma (AD) (n=4,286), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (n=1,280), large cell carcinoma (LCC) (n=153) and bronchioalveolar carcinoma (BAC) (n=94). Protein overexpression of cMET (>2+ in >50% cells) was higher in AD (35.9%) compared to other subgroups (12-20%) while RRM1 and TOP2A levels were lower in AD. ALK or ROS1 were rearranged in 5.3% of patients with AD compared to 3.7% of patients with LCC and 1.2% of patients with SCC. EGFR mutations were found at low prevalence in both the LCC (0%) and SCC cohorts (2.8%) compared to 21% in AD. Similar lower rates of BRAF mutations were observed in the LCC and SCC cohorts compared to AD (0%, 1.1% and 5.1%). Pathway analysis showed activating mutations in the ERK pathway in 40% of patients with AD. Only 10-12% of patients with LCC or SCC had activating mutations in the ERK pathway. Conclusions: Despite the limitations of this retrospective series, we report comprehensive profiling of the largest cohort of NSCLC. Tumor profiling reveals that ADs may be more addicted to the ERK pathway than other histological subtypes. Drugs which target cMET may also have most utility in AD. Full analysis by histological subtype and additional correlative data on protein expression, gene copy number and mutations will be presented.
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Create date
20/10/2014 10:41
Last modification date
20/08/2019 12:44
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