Sex-Chromosome Homomorphy in Palearctic Tree Frogs Results from Both Turnovers and X-Y Recombination.

Details

Ressource 1Download: serval:BIB_1522FEFFC637.P001 (673.50 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: author
License: Not specified
It was possible to publish this article open access thanks to a Swiss National Licence with the publisher.
Serval ID
serval:BIB_1522FEFFC637
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Sex-Chromosome Homomorphy in Palearctic Tree Frogs Results from Both Turnovers and X-Y Recombination.
Journal
Molecular Biology and Evolution
Author(s)
Dufresnes C., Borzée A., Horn A., Stöck M., Ostini M., Sermier R., Wassef J., Litvinchuck S.N., Kosch T.A., Waldman B., Jang Y., Brelsford A., Perrin N.
ISSN
1537-1719 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0737-4038
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
32
Number
9
Pages
2328-2337
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Contrasting with birds and mammals, poikilothermic vertebrates often have homomorphic sex chromosomes, possibly resulting from high rates of sex-chromosome turnovers and/or occasional X-Y recombination. Strong support for the latter mechanism was provided by four species of European tree frogs, which inherited from a common ancestor (∼ 5 Ma) the same pair of homomorphic sex chromosomes (linkage group 1, LG1), harboring the candidate sex-determining gene Dmrt1. Here, we test sex linkage of LG1 across six additional species of the Eurasian Hyla radiation with divergence times ranging from 6 to 40 Ma. LG1 turns out to be sex linked in six of nine resolved cases. Mapping the patterns of sex linkage to the Hyla phylogeny reveals several transitions in sex-determination systems within the last 10 My, including one switch in heterogamety. Phylogenetic trees of DNA sequences along LG1 are consistent with occasional X-Y recombination in all species where LG1 is sex linked. These patterns argue against one of the main potential causes for turnovers, namely the accumulation of deleterious mutations on nonrecombining chromosomes. Sibship analyses show that LG1 recombination is strongly reduced in males from most species investigated, including some in which it is autosomal. Intrinsically low male recombination might facilitate the evolution of male heterogamety, and the presence of important genes from the sex-determination cascade might predispose LG1 to become a sex chromosome.
Keywords
Alleles, Animals, Anura/genetics, Evolution, Molecular, Female, Genetic Linkage, Genetic Speciation, Male, Microsatellite Repeats, Phylogeny, Recombination, Genetic, X Chromosome/genetics, Y Chromosome/genetics
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
29/04/2015 10:26
Last modification date
25/09/2019 6:08
Usage data