Gender differences in firesetting: results from the national epidemiologic survey on alcohol and related conditions (NESARC).

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_14FB22B419CC
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Gender differences in firesetting: results from the national epidemiologic survey on alcohol and related conditions (NESARC).
Journal
Psychiatry research
Author(s)
Hoertel N., Le Strat Y., Schuster J.P., Limosin F.
ISSN
0165-1781 (Print)
ISSN-L
0165-1781
Publication state
Published
Issued date
30/12/2011
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
190
Number
2-3
Pages
352-358
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
This study presents gender differences in sociodemographics and in psychiatric correlates of firesetting in the United States. Data were derived from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), a representative sample of U.S. adults. Face-to-face interviews of more than 43,000 adults were conducted in the 2001-2002 period. This study focused on the 407 subjects with a lifetime history of firesetting. The prevalence of lifetime firesetting in the U.S. was 1.7% in men and 0.4% in women. Firesetting was significantly associated with a wide range of antisocial behaviors that differed by gender. Multivariate logistic regression analyses indicated associations in both genders with psychiatric and addictive disorders. Men with a lifetime history of firesetting were significantly more likely than men without such history to have lifetime generalized anxiety disorder as well as a diagnosis of conduct disorder, antisocial personality disorder, alcohol or cannabis use disorder, and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder. Women with a lifetime history of firesetting were significantly more likely than women without such history to have lifetime alcohol or cannabis use disorder, conduct disorder, and antisocial or obsessive compulsive personality disorder, as well as psychotic disorder, bipolar disorder or schizoid personality disorder. Women with a lifetime history of firesetting were significantly more likely than men with such history to have a lifetime diagnosis of alcohol abuse and antisocial personality disorder as well as a diagnosis of schizoid personality disorder. Our findings indicate that firesetting in women could represent a behavioral manifestation of a broader spectrum than firesetting in men.
Keywords
Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Alcoholism/epidemiology, Alcoholism/psychology, Female, Firesetting Behavior/epidemiology, Health Surveys, Humans, Male, Mental Disorders/epidemiology, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Retrospective Studies, Sex Characteristics, Young Adult
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
18/04/2019 9:13
Last modification date
04/09/2019 6:26
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