Long-term effects of cannabis on brain structure.

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Version: Final published version
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Serval ID
serval:BIB_14EC6BEB80DF
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Long-term effects of cannabis on brain structure.
Journal
Neuropsychopharmacology
Author(s)
Battistella G., Fornari E., Annoni J.M., Chtioui H., Dao K., Fabritius M., Favrat B., Mall J.F., Maeder P., Giroud C.
ISSN
1740-634X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0893-133X
Publication state
Published
Issued date
08/2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
39
Number
9
Pages
2041-2048
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Comparative Study ; Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
The dose-dependent toxicity of the main psychoactive component of cannabis in brain regions rich in cannabinoid CB1 receptors is well known in animal studies. However, research in humans does not show common findings across studies regarding the brain regions that are affected after long-term exposure to cannabis. In the present study, we investigate (using Voxel-based Morphometry) gray matter changes in a group of regular cannabis smokers in comparison with a group of occasional smokers matched by the years of cannabis use. We provide evidence that regular cannabis use is associated with gray matter volume reduction in the medial temporal cortex, temporal pole, parahippocampal gyrus, insula, and orbitofrontal cortex; these regions are rich in cannabinoid CB1 receptors and functionally associated with motivational, emotional, and affective processing. Furthermore, these changes correlate with the frequency of cannabis use in the 3 months before inclusion in the study. The age of onset of drug use also influences the magnitude of these changes. Significant gray matter volume reduction could result either from heavy consumption unrelated to the age of onset or instead from recreational cannabis use initiated at an adolescent age. In contrast, the larger gray matter volume detected in the cerebellum of regular smokers without any correlation with the monthly consumption of cannabis may be related to developmental (ontogenic) processes that occur in adolescence.
Keywords
Adolescent, Adult, Age of Onset, Brain/drug effects, Brain/growth & development, Brain/pathology, Cannabis/adverse effects, Gray Matter/drug effects, Gray Matter/pathology, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Marijuana Abuse/pathology, Marijuana Smoking/adverse effects, Surveys and Questionnaires, Time Factors, Young Adult
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
19/03/2014 16:22
Last modification date
07/07/2021 6:35
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