Dietary Patterns are Differentially Associated with Atypical and Melancholic Subtypes of Depression.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_0F5053015580
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Dietary Patterns are Differentially Associated with Atypical and Melancholic Subtypes of Depression.
Journal
Nutrients
Author(s)
Lasserre A.M., Strippoli M.F., Marques-Vidal P., Williams L.J., N Jacka F., Vandeleur C.L., Vollenweider P., Preisig M.
ISSN
2072-6643 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2072-6643
Publication state
Published
Issued date
26/02/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
13
Number
3
Pages
768
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Diet has been associated with the risk of depression, whereas different subtypes of depression have been linked with different cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs). In this study, our aims were to 1) identify dietary patterns with exploratory factor analysis, 2) assess cross-sectional associations between dietary patterns and depression subtypes, and 3) examine the potentially mediating effect of dietary patterns in the associations between CVRFs and depression subtypes. In the first follow-up of the population-based CoLaus|PsyCoLaus study (2009-2013, 3554 participants, 45.6% men, mean age 57.5 years), a food frequency questionnaire assessed dietary intake and a semi-structured interview allowed to characterize major depressive disorder into current or remitted atypical, melancholic, and unspecified subtypes. Three dietary patterns were identified: Western, Mediterranean, and Sweet-Dairy. Western diet was positively associated with current atypical depression, but negatively associated with current and remitted melancholic depression. Sweet-Dairy was positively associated with current melancholic depression. However, these dietary patterns did not mediate the associations between CVRFs and depression subtypes. Hence, although we could show that people with different subtypes of depression make different choices regarding their diet, it is unlikely that these differential dietary choices account for the well-established associations between depression subtypes and CVRFs.
Keywords
atypical, cardiovascular risk factors, cross-sectional, depression subtypes, dietary patterns, major depressive disorder, melancholic, population-based study
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
08/03/2021 14:25
Last modification date
17/04/2021 6:33
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