Bladder function before and after selective dorsal rhizotomy in children with cerebral palsy

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_0ECA53FCABFF
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Bladder function before and after selective dorsal rhizotomy in children with cerebral palsy
Journal
Journal of Urology
Author(s)
Houle  A. M., Vernet  O., Jednak  R., Pippi Salle  J. L., Farmer  J. P.
ISSN
0022-5347 (Print)
Publication state
Published
Issued date
09/1998
Volume
160
Number
3 Pt 2
Pages
1088-91
Notes
Journal Article --- Old month value: Sep
Abstract
PURPOSE: Approximately a third of children with cerebral palsy are expected to present with dysfunctional voiding symptoms. Selective dorsal rhizotomy, which is indicated for managing lower extremity spasticity in children with cerebral palsy, also has the potential of affecting bladder function. We evaluate the impact of selective dorsal rhizotomy on bladder function by comparing preoperative and postoperative symptoms, and urodynamic parameters in children undergoing selective dorsal rhizotomy for spasticity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We reviewed urodynamic studies in 25 boys and 15 girls with a mean age plus or minus standard deviation of 5.43+/-2.1 years who underwent selective dorsal rhizotomy for spasticity at our institution between January 1992 and September 1995. Urodynamics were performed preoperatively only in 22 patients, preoperative and postoperatively in 13, and postoperatively only in 5. Preoperative urodynamic studies were done within 2 weeks of surgery and postoperative studies were done at least 6 months after surgery (mean 1.32+/-0.65 years). RESULTS: Of the 35 patients with preoperative urodynamic studies total bladder capacity, pressure specific volumes and full resting pressure were abnormal for age in 23 (65.7%). In addition, 17 of the 23 children (74%) were completely asymptomatic. In the group that underwent preoperative and postoperative urodynamic studies there was significant improvement in total bladder capacity (p <0.005) and pressure specific volumes (p <0.005) using the paired Student t test. All children had neurological improvement postoperatively, 5 of 7 (71%) who were incontinent preoperatively became continent and none had deterioration on urodynamics. CONCLUSIONS: At least half of the children with spastic cerebral palsy have clinically silent bladder dysfunction. Selective dorsal rhizotomy improves spasticity and significantly improves bladder storage characteristics. We propose that urodynamic studies be included in the evaluation of children with spastic cerebral palsy who are possible candidates for selective dorsal rhizotomy to treat lower limb spasticity.
Keywords
Cerebral Palsy/*complications/physiopathology Child Child, Preschool Female Humans Male Muscle Spasticity Postoperative Period Preoperative Care *Rhizotomy/methods Urinary Bladder/*physiopathology Urinary Bladder Diseases/etiology/*surgery
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
25/01/2008 13:13
Last modification date
20/08/2019 12:35
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