Early investigational drugs that target epidermal growth factor receptors for the treatment of head and neck cancer.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_0EC768BE5318
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Early investigational drugs that target epidermal growth factor receptors for the treatment of head and neck cancer.
Journal
Expert Opinion On Investigational Drugs
Author(s)
Ugurluer G., Ozsahin M.
ISSN
1744-7658 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1354-3784
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2014
Volume
23
Number
12
Pages
1637-1654
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) remains a challenging clinical problem, due to the persistent high rate of local and distant failures and the occurrence of secondary primaries. For locally advanced SCCHN, a combination of chemotherapy (CT), radiation or surgery is often used, but there are limitations, which may reduce compliance. Molecular targeted therapies, namely anti-EGFR treatments, are in development with the aim of improving clinical outcomes and mitigating treatment-related toxicities.
AREAS COVERED: This review provides an overview of early investigational drugs that target EGFR for the treatment of SCCHN and discusses the ongoing trials in this domain.
EXPERT OPINION: Targeted therapies are increasingly used in oncology, especially in SCCHN. Cetuximab has demonstrated a significant improvement in the treatment outcome, both as a curative treatment in combination with radiation therapy and as a palliative treatment in combination with CT; however, it failed to show any benefit in combination with concomitant chemoradiotherapy. Presently, there are many new agents, including monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, which are either currently under investigation for or which warrant further investigation for treating SCCHN. The discovery of predictive factors that help to identify patients most likely to respond to EGFR inhibitors as well as patient-customized therapies would help to improve patient outcomes in the future.
Pubmed
Create date
19/06/2015 13:48
Last modification date
10/04/2020 5:26
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