Learning-induced plasticity in human audition: Objects, time, and space.

Details

Ressource 1Request a copyDownload: BIB_0E38CE0E08C4.P001.pdf (914.90 [Ko])
State: Deleted
Version: author
Serval ID
serval:BIB_0E38CE0E08C4
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Learning-induced plasticity in human audition: Objects, time, and space.
Journal
Hearing Research
Author(s)
Spierer L., De Lucia M., Bernasconi F., Grivel J., Bourquin N.M., Clarke S., Murray M.M.
ISSN
1878-5891[electronic], 0378-5955[linking]
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2011
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
271
Number
1-2
Pages
88-102
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Abstract
The human auditory system is comprised of specialized but interacting anatomic and functional pathways encoding object, spatial, and temporal information. We review how learning-induced plasticity manifests along these pathways and to what extent there are common mechanisms subserving such plasticity. A first series of experiments establishes a temporal hierarchy along which sounds of objects are discriminated along basic to fine-grained categorical boundaries and learned representations. A widespread network of temporal and (pre)frontal brain regions contributes to object discrimination via recursive processing. Learning-induced plasticity typically manifested as repetition suppression within a common set of brain regions. A second series considered how the temporal sequence of sound sources is represented. We show that lateralized responsiveness during the initial encoding phase of pairs of auditory spatial stimuli is critical for their accurate ordered perception. Finally, we consider how spatial representations are formed and modified through training-induced learning. A population-based model of spatial processing is supported wherein temporal and parietal structures interact in the encoding of relative and absolute spatial information over the initial ∼300ms post-stimulus onset. Collectively, these data provide insights into the functional organization of human audition and open directions for new developments in targeted diagnostic and neurorehabilitation strategies.
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
15/02/2010 11:43
Last modification date
20/08/2019 13:35
Usage data