The relationship between mitochondrial function and walking performance in older adults with a wide range of physical function.

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State: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
License: Not specified
Serval ID
serval:BIB_0D2E17741FF0
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
The relationship between mitochondrial function and walking performance in older adults with a wide range of physical function.
Journal
Experimental gerontology
Author(s)
Santanasto A.J., Coen P.M., Glynn N.W., Conley K.E., Jubrias S.A., Amati F., Strotmeyer E.S., Boudreau R.M., Goodpaster B.H., Newman A.B.
ISSN
1873-6815 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0531-5565
Publication state
Published
Issued date
08/2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
81
Pages
1-7
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Age related declines in walking performance may be partly attributable to skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction as mitochondria produce over 90% of ATP needed for movement and the capacity for oxidative phosphorylation decreases with age.
Participants were from two studies: an ancillary to the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) Study (n=33), which recruited lower functioning participants (Short Physical Performance Battery [SPPB], 7.8±1.2), and the Study of Energy and Aging-Pilot (SEA, n=29), which enrolled higher functioning (SPPB, 10.8±1.4). Physical activity was measured objectively using the Actigraph accelerometer (LIFE) and SenseWear Pro armband (SEA). Phosphocreatine recovery following muscle contraction of the quadriceps was measured using (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and ATPmax (mM ATP/s) was calculated. Walking performance was defined as time (s) to walk 400m at a usual-pace. The cross-sectional association between mitochondrial function and walking performance was assessed using multivariable linear regression.
Participants were 77.6±5.3years, 64.2% female and 67.2% white. ATPmax was similar in LIFE vs. SEA (0.52±0.14 vs. 0.55±0.14, p=0.31), despite different function and activity levels (1.6±2.2 vs.77.4±73.3min of moderate activity/day, p<0.01). Higher ATPmax was related to faster walk-time in SEA (r(2)=0.19, p=0.02,); but not the LIFE (r(2)<0.01, p=0.74) cohort.
Mitochondrial function was associated with walking performance in higher functioning, active older adults, but not lower functioning, sedentary older adults.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Funding(s)
Swiss National Science Foundation / Careers / PZ00P3-149398
Create date
04/07/2016 11:09
Last modification date
20/01/2020 7:20
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