The evolution of inbred social systems in spiders and other organisms: from short-term gains to long-term evolutionary dead-ends?

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_0CBD87709B87
Type
A part of a book
Publication sub-type
Chapter: chapter ou part
Collection
Publications
Title
The evolution of inbred social systems in spiders and other organisms: from short-term gains to long-term evolutionary dead-ends?
Title of the book
Advances in the Study of Behavior
Author(s)
Avilés L., Purcell J.
Publisher
Elsevier
ISBN
978-0-12-394288-3
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2012
Editor
Brockmann H.J., Roper T.J., Naguib M., Mitani J.C., Simmons L.W.
Volume
44
Pages
99-133
Language
english
Abstract
The question of why some social systems have evolved close inbreeding is particularly intriguing given expected short- and long-term negative effects of this breeding system. Using social spiders as a case study, we quantitatively show that the potential costs of avoiding inbreeding through dispersal and solitary living could have outweighed the costs of inbreeding depression in the origin of inbred spider sociality. We further review the evidence that despite being favored in the short term, inbred spider sociality may constitute in the long run an evolutionary dead end. We also review other cases, such as the naked mole rats and some bark and ambrosia beetles, mites, psocids, thrips, parasitic ants, and termites, in which inbreeding and sociality are associated and the evidence for and against this breeding system being, in general, an evolutionary dead end.
Keywords
Inbreeding, Dispersal, Group living, Inbreeding depression, Inbreeding avoidance, Evolutionary dead end, Philopatry, Social spiders, Naked mole rats, Ambrosia beetles, Inquiline ants, Spider mites, Thrips, Psocids
Web of science
Create date
05/03/2012 11:09
Last modification date
20/08/2019 13:34
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